What are the parenting experiences of fathers? The use of household survey data to inform decisions about the delivery of evidence-based parenting interventions to fathers

Sanders, Matthew R., Dittman, Cassandra K., Keown, Louise J., Farruggia, Sue and Rose, Dennis (2010) What are the parenting experiences of fathers? The use of household survey data to inform decisions about the delivery of evidence-based parenting interventions to fathers. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 41 5: 562-581. doi:10.1007/s10578-010-0188-z

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Author Sanders, Matthew R.
Dittman, Cassandra K.
Keown, Louise J.
Farruggia, Sue
Rose, Dennis
Title What are the parenting experiences of fathers? The use of household survey data to inform decisions about the delivery of evidence-based parenting interventions to fathers
Journal name Child Psychiatry and Human Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0009-398X
1573-3327
Publication date 2010-10-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10578-010-0188-z
Open Access Status
Volume 41
Issue 5
Start page 562
End page 581
Total pages 20
Editor Kenneth Tarnowski
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Springer New York
Language eng
Subject 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Abstract Participants were 933 fathers participating in a large-scale household survey of parenting practices in Queensland Australia. Although the majority of fathers reported having few problems with their children, a significant minority reported behavioral and emotional problems and 5% reported that their child showed a potentially problematic level of oppositional and defiant behavior. Reports of child problems were associated with fathers' levels of personal stress and socioeconomic disadvantage. Approximately half of all fathers reported the use of one or more coercive parenting strategies (shouting and yelling, hitting the child with their hand or with an object) with fathers' use of hitting being associated with child behavior difficulties. Fathers reported low rates of help seeking or participation in parenting courses, with socially disadvantaged fathers being less likely to complete parenting programs than other fathers. Implications for research on increasing fathers' participation rates in parenting programs are discussed and directions for future research highlighted.
Formatted abstract
Participants were 933 fathers participating in a large-scale household survey of parenting practices in Queensland Australia. Although the majority of fathers reported having few problems with their children, a significant minority reported behavioral and emotional problems and 5% reported that their child showed a potentially problematic level of oppositional and defiant behavior. Reports of child problems were associated with fathers' levels of personal stress and socioeconomic disadvantage. Approximately half of all fathers reported the use of one or more coercive parenting strategies (shouting and yelling, hitting the child with their hand or with an object) with fathers' use of hitting being associated with child behavior difficulties. Fathers reported low rates of help seeking or participation in parenting courses, with socially disadvantaged fathers being less likely to complete parenting programs than other fathers. Implications for research on increasing fathers' participation rates in parenting programs are discussed and directions for future research highlighted.
© 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010
Keyword Fathers
Parenting
Oppositional behavior
Family support
Community survey
Theoretical development of Triple P
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Theoretical Development of Triple P
Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 21 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 24 Dec 2010, 01:14:39 EST by Dr James Kirby on behalf of School of Psychology