Cost-effectiveness of interventions to promote fruit and vegetable consumption

Cobiac, LJ, Vos, T and Veerman, JL (2010) Cost-effectiveness of interventions to promote fruit and vegetable consumption. PLoS One, 5 11: e14148-1-e14148-8. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0014148


Author Cobiac, LJ
Vos, T
Veerman, JL
Title Cost-effectiveness of interventions to promote fruit and vegetable consumption
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2010-11-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0014148
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 5
Issue 11
Start page e14148-1
End page e14148-8
Total pages 8
Place of publication San Francisco, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Abstract Background: Fruits and vegetables are an essential part of the human diet, but many people do not consume the recommended serves to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer. In this research, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness of interventions to promote fruit and vegetable consumption to determine which interventions are good value for money, and by how much current strategies can reduce the population disease burden.
Formatted abstract
Background: Fruits and vegetables are an essential part of the human diet, but many people do not consume the
recommended serves to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancer. In this research, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness of
interventions to promote fruit and vegetable consumption to determine which interventions are good value for money, and
by how much current strategies can reduce the population disease burden.
Methods/Principal Findings: In a review of published literature, we identified 23 interventions for promoting fruit and
vegetable intake in the healthy adult population that have sufficient evidence for cost-effectiveness analysis. For each
intervention, we model the health impacts in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), the costs of intervention and the
potential cost-savings from averting disease treatment, to determine cost-effectiveness of each intervention over the
lifetime of the population, from an Australian health sector perspective. Interventions that rely on dietary counselling,
telephone contact, worksite promotion or other methods to encourage change in dietary behaviour are not highly effective
or cost-effective. Only five out of 23 interventions are less than an A$50,000 per disability-adjusted life year costeffectiveness
threshold, and even the most effective intervention can avert only 5% of the disease burden attributed to
insufficient fruit and vegetable intake.
Conclusions/Significance: We recommend more investment in evaluating interventions that address the whole population,
such as changing policies influencing price or availability of fruits and vegetables, to see if these approaches can provide
more effective and cost-effective incentives for improving fruit and vegetable intake.
© 2010 Cobiac et al.

Keyword Increase consumption
Randomized-trial
Cardiovascular-disease
Dietary intervention
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 351558
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article# e14148, pp.1-8

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 19 Dec 2010, 10:03:36 EST