Early users of fertility treatment with hormones and IVF: Women who live in major cities and have private health insurance

Herbert, Danielle L., Lucke, Jayne C. and Dobson, Annette J. (2010) Early users of fertility treatment with hormones and IVF: Women who live in major cities and have private health insurance. Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 6: 629-634. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00625.x


Author Herbert, Danielle L.
Lucke, Jayne C.
Dobson, Annette J.
Title Early users of fertility treatment with hormones and IVF: Women who live in major cities and have private health insurance
Journal name Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2010-12-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00625.x
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 629
End page 634
Total pages 6
Place of publication Carlton, Vic., Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective:
To identify early users (women  aged <34 years) of fertility treatment with
hormones and in vitro fertilisation (IVF).

Methods:

A cross-sectional survey of infertile women from fertility clinics (n=59)
and from the community (Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
participants) who had (n=121) or had not (n=110) used hormones/IVF as treatment for infertility. Associations between socio-demographic, reproductive and
lifestyle factors, medical conditions and recurrent symptoms and using treatment (or not) were analysed using multivariable logistic regression.

Results:

Among infertile women who had used treatment (community vs clinic), women from clinics had lower odds of living outside major cities, using hormones only, i.e., not IVF, or recurrent headaches/ migraines, severe tiredness, or stiff/painful joints; and higher odds of recent diagnoses of urinary tract infection or anxiety disorder. Compared to infertile women who had not used treatment, women from clinics had lower odds of living outside major cities, recurrent allergies or severe tiredness; and higher odds of having private health insurance for hospital or ancillary services, recent diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome or recurrent constipation.

Conclusions:

Compared to infertile women in the community, living in major
cities and having private health insurance are associated with early use of treatment
for infertility at specialist clinics by women aged <34 years.

Implications:

These results provided evidence of inequity of services for infertile women.


Keyword Infertility
Treatment
Access
Insurance
Equity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 10 Dec 2010, 18:53:55 EST by Dr Danielle Herbert on behalf of School of Public Health