Rising to the challenge of sustaining coral reef resilience

Hughes, Terry P., Graham, Nicholas A.J., Jackson, Jeremy B.C., Mumby, Peter J. and Steneck, Robert S. (2010) Rising to the challenge of sustaining coral reef resilience. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 25 11: 633-642. doi:10.1016/j.tree.2010.07.011


Author Hughes, Terry P.
Graham, Nicholas A.J.
Jackson, Jeremy B.C.
Mumby, Peter J.
Steneck, Robert S.
Title Rising to the challenge of sustaining coral reef resilience
Journal name Trends in Ecology & Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0169-5347
1872-8383
Publication date 2010-11-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.tree.2010.07.011
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 25
Issue 11
Start page 633
End page 642
Total pages 10
Editor Katrina A. Lythgoe
Place of publication Cambridge, U.K.
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Abstract Phase-shifts from one persistent assemblage of species to another have become increasingly commonplace on coral reefs and in many other ecosystems due to escalating human impacts. Coral reef science, monitoring and global assessments have focused mainly on producing detailed descriptions of reef decline, and continue to pay insufficient attention to the underlying processes causing degradation. A more productive way forward is to harness new theoretical insights and empirical information on why some reefs degrade and others do not. Learning how to avoid undesirable phase-shifts, and how to reverse them when they occur, requires an urgent reform of scientific approaches, policies, governance structures and coral reef management.
Formatted abstract
Phase-shifts from one persistent assemblage of species to another have become increasingly commonplace on coral reefs and in many other ecosystems due to escalating human impacts. Coral reef science, monitoring and global assessments have focused mainly on producing detailed descriptions of reef decline, and continue to pay insufficient attention to the underlying processes causing degradation. A more productive way forward is to harness new theoretical insights and empirical information on why some reefs degrade and others do not. Learning how to avoid undesirable phase-shifts, and how to reverse them when they occur, requires an urgent reform of scientific approaches, policies, governance structures and coral reef management.
© 2010 Elsevier Ltd.
Keyword Anthropogenic effect
Coral reef
Ecosystem management
Ecosystem resilience
Environmental degradation
Environmental monitoring
Governance approach
Sustainability
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 30 Nov 2010, 03:09:53 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences