Salbutamol prevents the increase of respiratory resistance caused by tracheal intubation during sevoflurane anesthesia in asthmatic children

Scalfaro, P., Sly, P.D., Sims, C. and Habre, W. (2001) Salbutamol prevents the increase of respiratory resistance caused by tracheal intubation during sevoflurane anesthesia in asthmatic children. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 93 4: 898-902. doi:10.1097/00000539-200110000-00019


Author Scalfaro, P.
Sly, P.D.
Sims, C.
Habre, W.
Title Salbutamol prevents the increase of respiratory resistance caused by tracheal intubation during sevoflurane anesthesia in asthmatic children
Journal name Anesthesia and Analgesia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-2999
1526-7598
Publication date 2001-10-01
Year available 2001
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/00000539-200110000-00019
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 93
Issue 4
Start page 898
End page 902
Total pages 5
Place of publication Baltimore, MD, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Asthmatic children having their tracheas intubated with sevoflurane often have an increase in respiratory system resistance (Rrs). In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study, we investigated the protective effect of an inhaled β2-adrenergic agonist. Either salbutamol or placebo was administered 30 to 60 min before anesthesia to 30 mildly to moderately asthmatic children scheduled for elective surgery. Induction was performed with sevoflurane in a mixture of 50% nitrous oxide in oxygen and maintained at 3%, with children breathing spontaneously via a face mask and Jackson-Rees modification of the T-piece. Airway opening pressure and flow were measured before and after insertion of an oral endotracheal tube. Rrs and respiratory system compliance were calculated with multilinear regression analysis. The groups were comparable with respect to age, weight, asthma history, and breathing pattern. Intubation induced a different Rrs response in the two groups: children treated with salbutamol showed a 6.0% (-25.2% to +13.2%) decrease (mean, 95% confidence interval), whereas in the Placebo group there was a 17.7% (+4.4% to +30.9%) increase (P = 0.04). Neither asthma history nor the serum inflammation marker eosinophilic cationic protein was predictive for this response. We conclude that when using sevoflurane in mildly to moderately asthmatic children, a preanesthetic treatment withinhaled salbutamol is protective of an increase in Rrs.
Keyword Eosinophil cationic protein
Bronchial asthma
Mechanics
ECP
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 17 Nov 2010, 21:45:58 EST