Changing epidemiology of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria infections

Thomson, Rachel M. (2010) Changing epidemiology of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 16 10: 1576-1583. doi:10.3201/eid1610.091201

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Author Thomson, Rachel M.
Title Changing epidemiology of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria infections
Journal name Emerging Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1080-6040
1080-6059
Publication date 2010-10-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3201/eid1610.091201
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 16
Issue 10
Start page 1576
End page 1583
Total pages 8
Place of publication Atlanta, GA, United States
Publisher National Center for Infectious Diseases
Language eng
Abstract Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) disease is a notify able condition in Queensland, Australia. Mycobacterial isolates that require species identification are forwarded to the Queensland Mycobacterial Reference Laboratory, providing a central opportunity to capture statewide data on the epidemiology of NTM disease. We compared isolates obtained in 1999 and 2005 and used data from the Queensland notification scheme to report the clinical relevance of these isolates. The incidence of notified cases of clinically significant pulmonary disease rose from 2.2 (1999) to 3.2 (2005) per 100,000 population. The pattern of disease has changed from predominantly cavitary disease in middle-aged men who smoke to fi bronodular disease in elderly women. Mycobacterium intracellulare is the main pathogen associated with the increase in isolates speciated in Queensland.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 123 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 17 Nov 2010, 07:40:52 EST by Dr Rachel Thomson on behalf of Medicine - Prince Charles Hospital