The 74 ka Toba super-eruption and southern Indian hominins: Archaeology, lithic technology and environments at Jwalapuram Locality 3

Haslam, Michael, Clarkson, Chris, Petraglia, Michael, Korisettar, Ravi, Jones, Sacha, Shipton, Ceri, Ditchfield, Peter and Ambrose, Stanley H. (2010) The 74 ka Toba super-eruption and southern Indian hominins: Archaeology, lithic technology and environments at Jwalapuram Locality 3. Journal of Archaeological Science, 37 12: 3370-3384. doi:10.1016/j.jas.2010.07.034

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Author Haslam, Michael
Clarkson, Chris
Petraglia, Michael
Korisettar, Ravi
Jones, Sacha
Shipton, Ceri
Ditchfield, Peter
Ambrose, Stanley H.
Title The 74 ka Toba super-eruption and southern Indian hominins: Archaeology, lithic technology and environments at Jwalapuram Locality 3
Journal name Journal of Archaeological Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-4403
1095-9238
Publication date 2010-12-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jas.2010.07.034
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 12
Start page 3370
End page 3384
Total pages 15
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Abstract Hominins living in southern India 74,000 years ago faced a deteriorating environment, as the global climate moved from interglacial into full glacial conditions. At the same time, South Asian populations witnessed the widespread deposition of tephra from the Sumatran Toba super-eruption, the largest explosive volcanic event of the past two million years. Here we report new data on the lithic technology and environmental context for a southern Indian site with hominin occupation in association with Toba tephra deposits: Jwalapuram Locality 3 in the Jurreru Valley. Sedimentological and isotopic studies demonstrate that a cooling trend was in effect in this part of southern India prior to the eruption, and that thick deposits of ash in the Jurreru Valley supported grassland communities before more wooded conditions were re-established. Detailed technological analyses of an expanded lithic sample from Locality 3 suggest cultural continuity after the eruptive event, and comparisons with lithic core technologies elsewhere indicate that Homo sapiens cannot be ruled out as the creator of these Middle Palaeolithic assemblages. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword South Asia
Late Pleistocene
Middle Palaeolithic
Human dispersal
Isotopes
Palaeoenvironment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP0987680
SBR 98-71480
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 16 Nov 2010, 23:24:08 EST by Chris Clarkson on behalf of School of Social Science