The two-pore domain K+ channel TASK-1 is closely associated with brain barriers and meninges

Kanjhan, Refik, Pow, David V., Noakes, Peter G. and Bellingham, Mark C. (2010) The two-pore domain K+ channel TASK-1 is closely associated with brain barriers and meninges. Journal of Molecular Histology, 41 6: 315-323. doi:10.1007/s10735-010-9293-3


Author Kanjhan, Refik
Pow, David V.
Noakes, Peter G.
Bellingham, Mark C.
Title The two-pore domain K+ channel TASK-1 is closely associated with brain barriers and meninges
Formatted title
The two-pore domain K+ channel TASK-1 is closely associated with brain barriers and meninges
Journal name Journal of Molecular Histology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1567-2379
1567-2387
Publication date 2010-12-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10735-010-9293-3
Open Access Status
Volume 41
Issue 6
Start page 315
End page 323
Total pages 9
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Language eng
Abstract Impairment of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and brain-CSF barrier has been implicated in neuropathology of several brain disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral edema, multiple sclerosis, neural inflammation, ischemia and stroke. Two-pore domain weakly inward rectifying K+ channel (TWIK)-related acid-sensitive potassium (TASK)-1 channels (K2p3.1; KCNK3) are among the targets that contribute to the development of these pathologies. For example TASK-1 activity is inhibited by acidification, ischemia, hypoxia and several signaling molecules released under pathologic conditions. We have used immuno-histochemistry to examine the distribution of the TASK-1 protein in structures associated with the BBB, blood-CSF barrier, brain-CSF barrier, and in the meninges of adult rat. Dense TASK-1 immuno-reactivity (TASK-1-IR) was observed in ependymal cells lining the fourth ventricle at the brain-CSF interface, in glial cells that ensheath the walls of blood vessels at the glio-vascular interface, and in the meninges. In these structures, TASK-1-IR often co-localized with glial fibrillary associated protein (GFAP) or vimentin. This study provides anatomical evidence for localization of TASK-1 K+ channels in cells that segregate distinct fluid compartments within and surrounding the brain. We suggest that TASK-1 channels, in coordination with other ion channels (e.g., aquaporins and chloride channels) and transporters (e.g., Na+-K+-ATPase and Na+-K+-2Cl(-)) and by virtue of its heterogeneous distribution, may differentially contribute to the varying levels of K+ vital for cellular function in these compartments. Our findings are likely to be relevant to recently reported roles of TASK-1 in cerebral ischemia, stroke and inflammatory brain disorders.
Formatted abstract
Impairment of the blood–brain barrier (BBB), the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and brain-CSF barrier has been implicated in neuropathology of several brain disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral edema, multiple sclerosis, neural inflammation, ischemia and stroke. Two-pore domain weakly inward rectifying K+ channel (TWIK)-related acid-sensitive potassium (TASK)-1 channels (K2p3.1; KCNK3) are among the targets that contribute to the development of these pathologies. For example TASK-1 activity is inhibited by acidification, ischemia, hypoxia and several signaling molecules released under pathologic conditions. We have used immuno-histochemistry to examine the distribution of the TASK-1 protein in structures associated with the BBB, blood-CSF barrier, brain-CSF barrier, and in the meninges of adult rat. Dense TASK-1 immuno-reactivity (TASK-1-IR) was observed in ependymal cells lining the fourth ventricle at the brain-CSF interface, in glial cells that ensheath the walls of blood vessels at the glio-vascular interface, and in the meninges. In these structures, TASK- 1-IR often co-localized with glial fibrillary associated protein (GFAP) or vimentin. This study provides anatomical evidence for localization of TASK-1 K+ channels in cells that segregate distinct fluid compartments within and surrounding the brain. We suggest that TASK-1 channels, in coordination with other ion channels (e.g., aquaporins and chloride channels) and transporters (e.g., Na+-K+- ATPase and Na+-K+-2Cl-) and by virtue of its heterogeneous distribution, may differentially contribute to the varying levels of K+ vital for cellular function in these compartments. Our findings are likely to be relevant to recently reported roles of TASK-1 in cerebral ischemia, stroke and inflammatory brain disorders. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Keyword Blood brain barrier
Cerebrospinal fluid
Inflammation
Ischemia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 16 Nov 2010, 09:00:29 EST by Dr Refik Kanjhan on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences