Unravelling languages: Multilingualism and language contact in Kalkaringi

Meakins, Felicity (2008). Unravelling languages: Multilingualism and language contact in Kalkaringi. In Jane Simpson and Gillian Wigglesworth (Ed.), Children's language and multilingualism: Indigenous language use at home and school (pp. 283-302) London, U.K.: Continuum.

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Author Meakins, Felicity
Title of chapter Unravelling languages: Multilingualism and language contact in Kalkaringi
Title of book Children's language and multilingualism: Indigenous language use at home and school
Place of Publication London, U.K.
Publisher Continuum
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
ISBN 9780826495167
0826495168
9780826495174
0826495176
Editor Jane Simpson
Gillian Wigglesworth
Chapter number 13
Start page 283
End page 302
Total pages 20
Total chapters 13
Language eng
Subjects 2003 Language Studies
20 Language, Communication and Culture
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Newcomers to Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory are often struck by the range of languages spoken, and the ease with which people switch between languages. It can be a daunting experience trying to understand and operate within this language environment. This chapter will describe the range of languages and linguistic practices used in one community, Kalkaringi. In Kalkaringi, older people continue to speak a traditional language (Gurindji), and younger speakers speak a new youth variety (Gurindji Kriol) which is built from Gurindji and Kriol elements. Warlpiri is also spoken by many people and English is the main language of non-Indigenous institutions. In addition, people switch and mix these languages in various ways. Although the picture is very complex, this paper will show that there are clear patterns of language use. Understanding the patterns can help people working in the communities make sense of these complex environments.
Keyword Kalkaringi
Languages
Multilingualism -- Australia
Language and education -- Australia
Linguistic minorities -- Australia
Language and languages -- Study and teaching -- Australia
Indigenous peoples -- Australia
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

 
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Created: Sat, 30 Oct 2010, 03:25:28 EST by Dr Felicity Meakins on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures