Social software and interactions in Web design: a contextual interview study of communication tool use in web design businesses

Dekker, Andrew, Viller, Stephen and Robinson, Ricky (2010) Social software and interactions in Web design: a contextual interview study of communication tool use in web design businesses. 472, School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, The University of Queensland.

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Author Dekker, Andrew
Viller, Stephen
Robinson, Ricky
Title Social software and interactions in Web design: a contextual interview study of communication tool use in web design businesses
School, Department or Centre School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering
Institution The University of Queensland
Open Access Status Other
Report Number 472
Publication date 2010-10-01
Start page 1
End page 5
Total pages 5
Publisher School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering (ITEE), The University of Queensland
Language eng
Subject 120304 Digital and Interaction Design
280104 Computer-Human Interaction
Abstract/Summary This paper outlines an interview study that was conducted to assist in understanding the role that computer mediated communication tools play in supporting designer-client interaction within web design businesses, in particular the limitations with existing tools used to support these processes. Web designers require continual and rich communications with their clients to inform and develop products which best represent their clients and clients’ target market. The interviews also examine the potential of social software for supporting designer-client communication. There are a number of findings identified by this interview study, in particular the importance of email for designer-client communication, and the reliance on tools that are common between both parties. This results in a reliance on general-purpose tools such as email,which do not effectively support the sharing and discussion around design artifacts. While social software has potential to be a solution to these issues, the dependence on direct client participation limits its potential. In our findings we identify the importance of email within this context, and suggest that social software to support designer-client communication should augment existing methods of communication rather than attempt to replace them.
Keyword Ethnographic action research
Contextual analysis
Web design
Methods : Observational

Document type: Department Technical Report
Collection: School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 01 Oct 2010, 10:09:10 EST by Mr Andrew Dekker on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering