What is a healthy body mass index for women in their seventies? Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

van Uffelen, Jannique G.Z., Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke, Brown, Wendy J. and Dobson, Annette J. (2010) What is a healthy body mass index for women in their seventies? Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 65 8: 847-853. doi:10.1093/gerona/glq058


Author van Uffelen, Jannique G.Z.
Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke
Brown, Wendy J.
Dobson, Annette J.
Title What is a healthy body mass index for women in their seventies? Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Journal name Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1079-5006
1758-535X
Publication date 2010-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/gerona/glq058
Volume 65
Issue 8
Start page 847
End page 853
Total pages 7
Editor Huber R. Warner
Luigi Ferrucci
Place of publication Springfield, Ill., U.S.A.
Publisher OUP for the Gerontological Society of America
Language eng
Subject 920502 Health Related to Ageing
111702 Aged Health Care
111712 Health Promotion
920507 Women's Health
Formatted abstract
Background. This study examines the relevance of the World Health Organization (WHO) optimal range for body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-25 kg/m 2 to morbidity in older women.
Methods. Data were from 11,553 women who completed five mailed surveys at 3-year intervals between 1996 (age 70-75 years) and 2008 (age 82-87 years). Incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, heart disease, and osteoporosis; hospital admissions; and mortality were assessed. The association between BMI in 1996 and each outcome was examined using logistic regression models with repeated measures and a proportional hazards model for survival.
Results. There were consistent associations between increasing BMI and increasing incidence and prevalence of DM, hypertension, and heart disease and between increasing BMI and decreasing risk of osteoporosis. The association with hospital admission was J shaped and lowest for BMI of 22-24 kg/m2, whereas the association with mortality was U shaped, being lowest for BMI of 25-27 kg/m2. These associations were not affected by excluding women with cancer or excluding the first 5 years of follow-up.
Conclusions. These results illustrate the complexity of determining the optimal BMI range for women who survived to age 70-75 years. Although the WHO recommendation is appropriate for DM, hypertension, heart disease, and hospitalization, a slightly higher BMI range may be optimal for osteoporosis and mortality.
© 2010 The Author.
Keyword Women
Body mass index
Chronic conditions
Aged
Self rated health
Ooder adults
Mortality risk
Weight loss
Hip ratio
Obesity
Overweight
Consequences
Population
Height
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 08 Aug 2010, 10:03:05 EST