Epidemiology of alcohol-related burden of disease among Indigenous Australians

Calabria, B, Doran, CM, Vos, T, Shakeshaft, AP and Hall, W (2010) Epidemiology of alcohol-related burden of disease among Indigenous Australians. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 s1: S47-S51. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00553.x


Author Calabria, B
Doran, CM
Vos, T
Shakeshaft, AP
Hall, W
Title Epidemiology of alcohol-related burden of disease among Indigenous Australians
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1753-6405
1326-0200
Publication date 2010-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00553.x
Volume 34
Issue s1
Start page S47
End page S51
Total pages 5
Place of publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the burden of alcohol-related harm and underlying factors of this harm, by age and sex, for Indigenous and general population Australians.
METHODS: Population attributable fractions are used to estimate the disability adjusted life years (DALYs) for alcohol-related disease and injury. The DALYs were converted to rates per 1,000 by age and sex for the Indigenous and general populations.
RESULTS: Homicide and violence rates were much higher for Indigenous males: greatest population difference was for 30-44 years, Indigenous rate 8.9 times higher. Rates of suicide were also greater: the largest population difference was for 15-29 years, Indigenous rate 3.9 times higher. Similarly, for Indigenous females, homicide and violence rates were much higher: greatest population difference was for 30-44 years, Indigenous rate 18.1 times higher. Rates of suicide were also greater: the largest population difference was for 15-29 years, Indigenous rate 5.0 times higher.
CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol consumption and associated harms are of great concern for Indigenous Australians across all ages. Violent alcohol-related harms have been highlighted as a major concern.
IMPLICATIONS: To reduce the disproportionate burden of alcohol-related harm experienced by Indigenous Australians, targeted interventions should include the impact on families and communities and not just the individual.
© 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia.
Keyword Indigenous
Disability adjusted life year
Alcohol
Harms
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special Issue on Indigenous health. Edited by Jeanne Daly and Sandra Thompson.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 25 Jul 2010, 10:09:24 EST