Retinal photography for diabetic retinopathy screening in Indigenous primary health care: The Inala experience

Spurling, Geoffrey K. P., Askew, Deborah A., Hayman, Noel E., Hansar, Naomi, Cooney, Anna M. and Jackson, Claire L. (2010) Retinal photography for diabetic retinopathy screening in Indigenous primary health care: The Inala experience. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 s1: S30-S33. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00549.x

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Author Spurling, Geoffrey K. P.
Askew, Deborah A.
Hayman, Noel E.
Hansar, Naomi
Cooney, Anna M.
Jackson, Claire L.
Title Retinal photography for diabetic retinopathy screening in Indigenous primary health care: The Inala experience
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2010-07-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00549.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 34
Issue s1
Start page S30
End page S33
Total pages 4
Editor Jeanne Daly
Sandra Thompson
Place of publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Abstract Objective: We aimed to determine the impact of clinic based retinal photography on access to appropriate screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR).
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the impact of clinic based retinal photography on access to appropriate screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR).

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:
We opportunistically recruited patients undergoing their annual diabetic cycle of care over a two year period in the urban Indigenous primary health care clinic. Data were collected on retinal outcomes, health variables and referral patterns.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
Access to appropriate screening and ophthalmic follow up, prevalence of DR, acceptability and feasibility of clinic-based retinal photography were the main outcome measures of this study.

RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-two of a possible 147 patients consented to participate. 30% of participants had DR. Appropriate screening and ophthalmic follow up increased six fold, from 20 to 124 participants, following the introduction of the retinal camera. Most participants felt very positive about DR screening.

CONCLUSIONS:
Primary care DR screening using retinal photography can improve access to DR screening for indigenous patients, reduce the burden on busy outpatient departments and should reduce visual loss. Policy-makers could contribute to screening sustainability by funding a medicare item-number for primary care based DR screening associated with the annual diabetic cycle of care. An upfront Practice Incentive Program (PIP) payment could offset set up costs. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia
Keyword Diabetes
Retinopathy
Primary health care
Screening
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special Issue on Indigenous health

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 25 Jul 2010, 10:09:12 EST