GI Joe or Average Joe? The impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and advertisement effectiveness

Diedrichs, Phillippa C. and Lee, Christina (2010) GI Joe or Average Joe? The impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and advertisement effectiveness. Body Image, 7 3: 218-226. doi:10.1016/j.bodyim.2010.03.004

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Author Diedrichs, Phillippa C.
Lee, Christina
Title GI Joe or Average Joe? The impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and advertisement effectiveness
Journal name Body Image   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1740-1445
1873-6807
Publication date 2010-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.bodyim.2010.03.004
Volume 7
Issue 3
Start page 218
End page 226
Total pages 9
Editor T. Cash
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Increasing body size and shape diversity in media imagery may promote positive body image. While research has largely focused on female models and women's body image, men may also be affected by unrealistic images. We examined the impact of average-size and muscular male fashion models on men's and women's body image and perceived advertisement effectiveness. A sample of 330 men and 289 women viewed one of four advertisement conditions: no models, muscular, average-slim or average-large models. Men and women rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as muscular models. For men, exposure to average-size models was associated with more positive body image in comparison to viewing no models, but no difference was found in comparison to muscular models. Similar results were found for women. Internalisation of beauty ideals did not moderate these effects. These findings suggest that average-size male models can promote positive body image and appeal to consumers.
© 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Body image
Media
Advertising
Model size
Men
Television situation comedies
Thin-ideal internalization
Cultural expectations
Focused anxiety
Media images
Magazines
SATAQ-3
Self
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 24 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 25 Jul 2010, 10:08:28 EST