Nitrogen and phosphorus additions negatively affect tree species diversity in tropical forest regrowth trajectories

Siddique, Ilyas, Vieira, Ima Celia Guimaraes, Schmidt, Susanne, Lamb, David, Carvalho, Claudio Jose Reis, Figueiredo, Ricardo De, Blomberg, Simon and Davidson, Eric A. (2010) Nitrogen and phosphorus additions negatively affect tree species diversity in tropical forest regrowth trajectories. Ecology, 91 7: 2121-2131. doi:10.1890/09-0636.1

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ209593_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 614.21KB 0

Author Siddique, Ilyas
Vieira, Ima Celia Guimaraes
Schmidt, Susanne
Lamb, David
Carvalho, Claudio Jose Reis
Figueiredo, Ricardo De
Blomberg, Simon
Davidson, Eric A.
Title Nitrogen and phosphorus additions negatively affect tree species diversity in tropical forest regrowth trajectories
Journal name Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0012-9658
1939-9170
Publication date 2010-07-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1890/09-0636.1
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 91
Issue 7
Start page 2121
End page 2131
Total pages 11
Editor Donald R. Strong
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Language eng
Abstract Nutrient enrichment is increasingly affecting many tropical ecosystems, but there is no information on how this affects tree biodiversity. To examine dynamics in vegetation structure and tree species biomass and diversity, we annually remeasured tree species before and for six years after repeated additions of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in permanent plots of abandoned pasture in Amazonia. Nitrogen and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus addition shifted growth among woody species. Nitrogen stimulated growth of two common pioneer tree species and one common tree species adaptable to both high-and low-light environments, while P stimulated growth only of the dominant pioneer tree Rollinia exsucca (Annonaceae). Overall, N or P addition reduced tree assemblage evenness and delayed tree species accrual over time, likely due to competitive monopolization of other resources by the few tree species responding to nutrient enrichment with enhanced establishment and/or growth rates. Absolute tree growth rates were elevated for two years after nutrient addition. However, nutrient-induced shifts in relative tree species growth and reduced assemblage evenness persisted for more than three years after nutrient addition, favoring two nutrient-responsive pioneers and one early-secondary tree species. Surprisingly, N + P effects on tree biomass and species diversity were consistently weaker than N-only and P-only effects, because grass biomass increased dramatically in response to N + P addition. The resulting intensified competition probably prevented an expected positive N + P synergy in the tree assemblage. Thus, N or P enrichment may favor unknown tree functional response types, reduce the diversity of coexisting species, and delay species accrual during structurally and functionally complex tropical rainforest secondary succession.
Formatted abstract
Nutrient enrichment is increasingly affecting many tropical ecosystems, but there is no information on how this affects tree biodiversity. To examine dynamics in vegetation structure and tree species biomass and diversity, we annually remeasured tree species before and for six years after repeated additions of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in permanent plots of abandoned pasture in Amazonia. Nitrogen and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus addition shifted growth among woody species. Nitrogen stimulated growth of two common pioneer tree species and one common tree species adaptable to both high- and low-light environments, while P stimulated growth only of the dominant pioneer tree Rollinia exsucca (Annonaceae). Overall, N or P addition reduced tree assemblage evenness and delayed tree species accrual over time, likely due to competitive monopolization of other resources by the few tree species responding to nutrient enrichment with enhanced establishment and/or growth rates. Absolute tree growth rates were elevated for two years after nutrient addition. However, nutrient-induced shifts in relative tree species growth and reduced assemblage evenness persisted for more than three years after nutrient addition, favoring two nutrient-responsive pioneers and one early-secondary tree species. Surprisingly, N + P effects on tree biomass and species diversity were consistently weaker than N-only and P-only effects, because grass biomass increased dramatically in response to N + P addition. The resulting intensified competition probably prevented an expected positive N + P synergy in the tree assemblage. Thus, N or P enrichment may favor unknown tree functional response types, reduce the diversity of coexisting species, and delay species accrual during structurally and functionally complex tropical rainforest secondary succession.
© 2010 by the Ecological society or America.

Keyword Biodiversity loss
Clay Oxisol
Ecosystem fertilization
Mixed-effects models
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID NCC5-332
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation Publications
Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 26 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 36 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 25 Jul 2010, 10:07:20 EST