Predicting adjustment to perinatal death

Murray, J. A. and Callan, V. J. (1988) Predicting adjustment to perinatal death. British Journal of Medical Psychology, 61 9: 237-244. doi:10.18632/aging.101020


Author Murray, J. A.
Callan, V. J.
Title Predicting adjustment to perinatal death
Journal name British Journal of Medical Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-1129
Publication date 1988-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.18632/aging.101020
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 61
Issue 9
Start page 237
End page 244
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, UK
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject 1701 Psychology
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Abstract Estimates of biological age based on DNA methylation patterns, often referred to as "epigenetic age", "DNAm age", have been shown to be robust biomarkers of age in humans. We previously demonstrated that independent of chronological age, epigenetic age assessed in blood predicted all-cause mortality in four human cohorts. Here, we expanded our original observation to 13 different cohorts for a total sample size of 13,089 individuals, including three racial/ethnic groups. In addition, we examined whether incorporating information on blood cell composition into the epigenetic age metrics improves their predictive power for mortality. All considered measures of epigenetic age acceleration were predictive of mortality (p≤8.2x10(-9)), independent of chronological age, even after adjusting for additional risk factors (p<5.4x10(-4)), and within the racial/ethnic groups that we examined (non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, African Americans). Epigenetic age estimates that incorporated information on blood cell composition led to the smallest p-values for time to death (p=7.5x10(-43)). Overall, this study a) strengthens the evidence that epigenetic age predicts all-cause mortality above and beyond chronological age and traditional risk factors, and b) demonstrates that epigenetic age estimates that incorporate information on blood cell counts lead to highly significant associations with all-cause mortality.
Keyword DNA methylation
all-cause mortality
epigenetic clock
epigenetics
lifespan
mortality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID HHSN268201100012C
RC2 HL102419
HHSN268201100001I
HHSN268201100009I
RF1 AG036042
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MR/M013111/1
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R01 AG042187
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P30 ES023515
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R01 AG029451
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N01HC25195
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U34 AG051425
R01 AG042511
HHSN268201100001C
HHSN268201100004C
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 08 Jul 2010, 00:48:21 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences