Public hospital admissions for treating complications of clinical care: Incidence, costs and funding strategy

McNair, Peter, Jackson, Terri and Borovnicar, Daniel (2010) Public hospital admissions for treating complications of clinical care: Incidence, costs and funding strategy. Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 3: 330-333. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00536.x


Author McNair, Peter
Jackson, Terri
Borovnicar, Daniel
Title Public hospital admissions for treating complications of clinical care: Incidence, costs and funding strategy
Journal name Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2010-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00536.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 34
Issue 3
Start page 330
End page 333
Total pages 4
Place of publication Richmond, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To quantify the frequency of,
and the costs and payments associated
with, admissions for treatment of injuries
and illnesses that are consequences of
care.
Data sources:
Routinely-coded 2005/06
public hospital inpatient data from Victoria,
Australia (1.25 million admissions) and
corresponding patient-level cost data (1.04
million admissions). Payments reflected
DRG-based prospective rates.
Study design: Retrospective analysis of
admissions with principal diagnoses that
specify adverse events arising as a direct
consequence of healthcare.
Results:
1.5% (15,336) of the costed
admissions specifically treat an injury or
illness arising from medical or surgical care,
consuming 2.74% of hospital prospective
payments and representing $89.3 m (2.84%)
of total reported costs. 1.4% (17,429) of all
public hospital admissions and 2.82% of
hospital prospective payments (estimated
cost-$101.5 m per year) are committed
to treating complications of care. Private
residences or aged care facilities are
the source of 84.9% (14,804) of these
admissions. Inpatient death was the outcome
in 0.7% (118) of these admissions.
Implications: Admissions for treating
complications of care represent a small,
relatively expensive, proportion of
hospital admissions, which account for
disproportionate levels of hospital costs
and funding. A policy option providing
incentives to reduce the incidence and
costs of complications arising from care
includes allocating all costs arising from
transferred (re)admissions back to the
original episode of care and developing a
suite of specific DRGs to fund admissions
for treatment of complications.
© 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation
© 2010 Public Health Association of Australia
Keyword Hospital costs
Complications
Treatment outcome
Quality of care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 20 Jun 2010, 10:08:08 EST