Psychological distress is associated with a range of high-priority health conditions affecting working Australians

Holden, L, Scuffham, P, Hilton, M, Vecchio, N and Whiteford, H (2010) Psychological distress is associated with a range of high-priority health conditions affecting working Australians. Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 3: 304-310. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00531.x


Author Holden, L
Scuffham, P
Hilton, M
Vecchio, N
Whiteford, H
Title Psychological distress is associated with a range of high-priority health conditions affecting working Australians
Journal name Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2010-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00531.x
Volume 34
Issue 3
Start page 304
End page 310
Total pages 7
Place of publication Richmond, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Psychological distress
is growing in prevalence in Australia.
Comorbid psychological distress and/or
depressive symptoms are often associated
with poorer health, higher healthcare
utilisation and decreased adherence to
medical treatments.
Methods: The Australian Work Outcomes
Research Cost-benefit (WORC) study
cross-sectional screening dataset was
used to explore the association between
psychological distress and a range
of health conditions in a sample of
approximately 78,000 working Australians.
The study uses the World Health
Organization Health and Productivity
Questionnaire (HPQ), to identify selfreported
health status. Within the HPQ
is the Kessler 6 (K6), a six-item scale
of psychological distress which strongly
discriminates between those with and
without a mental disorder. Potential
confounders of age, sex, marital status,
number of children, education level
and annual income were included in
multivariate logistic regression models.
Results: Psychological distress was
significantly associated with all investigated
health conditions in both crude and
adjusted estimates. The conditions with
the strongest adjusted association were,
in order from highest: drug and alcohol
problems, fatigue, migraine, CVD, COPD,
injury and obesity.
Conclusions: Psychological distress
is strongly associated with all 14 health
conditions or risk factors investigated in
this study. Comorbid psychological distress
is a growing public health issue affecting
Australian workers.
© 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia
Keyword Psychological stress
Health conditions
Comorbidity
Public health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 29 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 20 Jun 2010, 10:07:52 EST