Persistence in stalking: A comparison of associations in general forensic and public figure samples

James, David V., McEwan, Troy E., MacKenzie, Rachel D., Meloy, J. Reid, Mullen, Paul E., Pathe, Michele T., Farnham, Frank R., Preston, Lulu F. and Darnley, Brian J. (2010) Persistence in stalking: A comparison of associations in general forensic and public figure samples. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, 21 2: 283-305. doi:10.1080/14789940903388994


Author James, David V.
McEwan, Troy E.
MacKenzie, Rachel D.
Meloy, J. Reid
Mullen, Paul E.
Pathe, Michele T.
Farnham, Frank R.
Preston, Lulu F.
Darnley, Brian J.
Title Persistence in stalking: A comparison of associations in general forensic and public figure samples
Journal name Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1478-9949
1478-9957
Publication date 2010-04-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/14789940903388994
Volume 21
Issue 2
Start page 283
End page 305
Total pages 13
Place of publication Abingdon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract In stalking research, the risk domain of persistence concerns the likelihood that intrusive behaviours will continue towards the same target. This is a major source of anxiety to victims, and is of practical importance in the allocation of expensive protective resources. This study examines the associations of persistence in two different samples: a public figure sample concerning inappropriate communications and approaches to members of the British Royal Family, and a sample concerning similar behaviours in a general forensic population. Despite differences in methodology and definition, factors associated with persistence proved similar: psychotic illness, intimacyseeking motivation and multiple or intrusive forms of communication. The results contribute to the emerging literature on the common ground between risk associations in general population and in public figure samples. They underline the prime importance of motivation and of mental health issues in assessing and managing risk. We recommend the adoption of a common conceptual framework in future research. © 2010 Taylor & Francis
Keyword Stalking
Risk assessment
Threat assessment
Persistence
Fixated
Public figure
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First published on: 14 December 2009

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 30 May 2010, 10:03:06 EST