Associations of excess weight gain during pregnancy with long-term maternal overweight and obesity: Evidence from 21 y postpartum follow-up

Mamun, AA, Kinarivala, M, O'Callaghan, MJ, Williams, GM, Najman, JM and Callaway, LK (2010) Associations of excess weight gain during pregnancy with long-term maternal overweight and obesity: Evidence from 21 y postpartum follow-up. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 91 5: 1336-1341. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.28950


Author Mamun, AA
Kinarivala, M
O'Callaghan, MJ
Williams, GM
Najman, JM
Callaway, LK
Title Associations of excess weight gain during pregnancy with long-term maternal overweight and obesity: Evidence from 21 y postpartum follow-up
Journal name American Journal of Clinical Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9165
1938-3207
Publication date 2010-05-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28950
Open Access Status
Volume 91
Issue 5
Start page 1336
End page 1341
Total pages 6
Place of publication Bethesda, United States
Publisher American Society for Nutrition
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: The contribution of gestational weight gain (GWG) to the development of obesity may have important implications for mothers in their later lives. However, whether GWG is a strong predictor of body mass index (BMI) 2 decades after the index pregnancy is unknown.
Objective: We examined the long-term effect of GWG by using a community-based birth cohort study.
Design: We followed a subsample of 2055 women from an original cohort of 7223 women who gave birth in Brisbane, Australia, between 1981 and 1983. Multivariable regression and multinomial regression were used to examine the independent associations of GWG per gestational week and Institute of Medicine (IOM) categories of combined prepregnancy BMI and GWG with BMI and its categories 21 y after the index pregnancy.
Results: In analyses using GWG per week as a continuous exposure variable, maternal BMI (in kg/m2) increased, on average, by 0.52 (95% CI: 0.31, 0.73) for a 0.1-kg/wk greater GWG. This association became stronger when adjusted for maternal prepregnancy BMI. Analyses with IOM categories showed a greater postnatal increase in BMI for women defined as having excessive GWG (3.72, on average; 95% CI: 3.12, 4.31) than for women with adequate GWG. The women who gained excess weight during pregnancy had increased odds of being overweight [odds ratio (OR): 2.15; 95% CI: 1.64, 2.82] or obese (OR: 4.49; 95% CI; 3.42, 5.89) 21 y after the index pregnancy. These associations were independent of other potential factors. Conclusion: Weight gain during pregnancy independently predicts the long-term weight gain and obesity of women. © 2010 American Society for Nutrition.
Keyword Birth cohort
Young-adults
Women
Retention
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 519756
G07B3135
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 09 May 2010, 10:06:46 EST