Differential effects of rare specific flavonoids on compatible and incompatible strains in the Myrica gale-Frankia actinorhizal symbiosis

Popovici, Jean, Comte, Gilles, Bagnarol, Émilie, Alloisio, Nicole, Fournier, Pascale, Bellvert, Floriant, Bertrand, Cédric and Fernandez, Maria P. (2010) Differential effects of rare specific flavonoids on compatible and incompatible strains in the Myrica gale-Frankia actinorhizal symbiosis. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 76 8: 2451-2460. doi:10.1128/AEM.02667-09

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Author Popovici, Jean
Comte, Gilles
Bagnarol, Émilie
Alloisio, Nicole
Fournier, Pascale
Bellvert, Floriant
Bertrand, Cédric
Fernandez, Maria P.
Title Differential effects of rare specific flavonoids on compatible and incompatible strains in the Myrica gale-Frankia actinorhizal symbiosis
Formatted title
Differential effects of rare specific flavonoids on compatible and incompatible strains in the Myrica gale-Frankia actinorhizal symbiosis
Journal name Applied and Environmental Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0099-2240
1098-5336
Publication date 2010-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/AEM.02667-09
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 76
Issue 8
Start page 2451
End page 2460
Total pages 10
Place of publication Washington, DC., United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Plant secondary metabolites, and specifically phenolics, play important roles when plants interact with their
environment and can act as weapons or positive signals during biotic interactions. One such interaction, the
establishment of mutualistic nitrogen-fixing symbioses, typically involves phenolic-based recognition mechanisms
between host plants and bacterial symbionts during the early stages of interaction. While these mechanisms
are well studied in the rhizobia-legume symbiosis, little is known about the role of plant phenolics in
the symbiosis between actinorhizal plants and Frankia genus strains. In this study, the responsiveness of
Frankia strains to plant phenolics was correlated with their symbiotic compatibility. We used Myrica gale, a
host species with narrow symbiont specificity, and a set of compatible and noncompatible Frankia strains. M.
gale
fruit exudate phenolics were extracted, and 8 dominant molecules were purified and identified as flavonoids
by high-resolution spectroscopic techniques. Total fruit exudates, along with two purified dihydrochalcone
molecules, induced modifications of bacterial growth and nitrogen fixation according to the symbiotic
specificity of strains, enhancing compatible strains and inhibiting incompatible ones. Candidate genes involved
in these effects were identified by a global transcriptomic approach using ACN14a strain whole-genome
microarrays. Fruit exudates induced differential expression of 22 genes involved mostly in oxidative stress
response and drug resistance, along with the overexpression of a whiB transcriptional regulator. This work
provides evidence for the involvement of plant secondary metabolites in determining symbiotic specificity and
expands our understanding of the mechanisms, leading to the establishment of actinorhizal symbioses. Copyright © 2010, American Society for Microbiology.
Keyword C-methylated dihydrochalones
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
Rhizobium-meliloti
Molecular phylogeny
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Supplemental material (read only) - http://aem.asm.org/content/76/8/2451/suppl/DC1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 18 Apr 2010, 10:08:14 EST