A great and powerful friend : a study of Australian and American relations between 1900 and 1975

Harper, Norman A great and powerful friend : a study of Australian and American relations between 1900 and 1975. St. Lucia, Qld.: University of Queensland Press, 1987.

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Author Harper, Norman
Title A great and powerful friend : a study of Australian and American relations between 1900 and 1975
Place of Publication St. Lucia, Qld.
Publisher University of Queensland Press
Publication year 1987
Sub-type Other
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
ISBN 0702217557
Language eng
Total number of pages 416
Subjects 360105 International Relations
210303 Australian History (excl. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History)
Formatted Abstract/Summary

COVER  SYNOPSIS

With a long coastline and small population, Australia could not hope to defend itself against external attack. It has therefore always felt the need for the protection of a “great and powerful friend”.

The United Kingdom traditionally filled that role. Shortly after Federation, however, Australian prime ministers began to look across the Pacific to the United States for help against an expanding Japan. Alfred Deakin envisaged a combination of Anglo-Saxon people-in Britain, America, Australia, and New Zealand- to stabilize the Pacific. Billy Hughes also wanted a coalition of Pacific powers to check Japanese expansion. When Japan entered the Second World War, John Curtin bypassed Britain and appealed directly to the United States for help.

Attempts to strengthen ties between Canberra and Washington culminated in 1951 in the ANZUS Treaty, which became the focal point in relations between the two countries. But closer collaboration raised the problem of the relationship between junior and senior partners in the alliance. Could Australia conduct an independent foreign policy and not become a satellite of the United States?

This important book traces the developing diplomatic relations between Australia and the United States during this century, tying together a great deal of specialized research on various Canberra, Washington, and London for the period 1944-51 has provided interesting case studies, and access to other previously unavailable material has enabled the author to throw fresh light on relations between Australia and the United States during the occupation of Japan, the Indonesian struggle for independence and the wars in Korea and Vietnam.

Keyword United States -- Foreign relations -- Australia
Australia -- Foreign relations -- United States
Q-Index Code AX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Permission received from University of Queensland Press to make this item publicly available on 5th June 2013

 
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Created: Fri, 09 Apr 2010, 11:19:12 EST by Ms Natalie Hull on behalf of Social Sciences and Humanities Library Service