Why Do Older People in New Zealand Enter Residential Care Rather than Choosing to Remain at Home, and Who Makes that Decision?

Diane Jorgensen, Hilary Arksey, Matthew Parsons, Hugh Senior and David Thomas (2009) Why Do Older People in New Zealand Enter Residential Care Rather than Choosing to Remain at Home, and Who Makes that Decision?. Ageing International, 34 1-2: 15-32. doi:10.1007/s12126-009-9034-7


Author Diane Jorgensen
Hilary Arksey
Matthew Parsons
Hugh Senior
David Thomas
Title Why Do Older People in New Zealand Enter Residential Care Rather than Choosing to Remain at Home, and Who Makes that Decision?
Journal name Ageing International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0163-5158
Publication date 2009-05-26
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12126-009-9034-7
Volume 34
Issue 1-2
Start page 15
End page 32
Total pages 17
Place of publication New York , U. S. A.
Publisher Springer
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract To investigate why older people with high support needs entered residential care and who made that decision. Longitudinal study in three New Zealand cities. Participants: older people (n = 144); (unpaid) caregivers (n = 47); service co-ordinators (n = 12); multidisciplinary team members (n = 4). Questionnaires: InterRAI Minimum Data Set Assessments Home Care; Caregiver Reaction Assessment; Mastery and control. Semi-structured interview questions focussing on decision-making, and concerns that might result in residential care entry. Interviews were at baseline and 6 months, or on entering residential care. Significant factors were found, which increased the likelihood of residential care entry for older people. These included: high scoring dependency on the instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) scale, and an adult child living some distance away. The evidence from the study participant groups highlighted contrasting views about who was important in the decision making about entry to residential care. Older people who had moved into residential care generally thought that doctors had played a key role, whereas family members and professionals tended to consider the move was the caregiver’s decision. Older people with good levels of knowledge about services and support, and good housing, were more likely to continue to live in the community. Policy makers and funders need to understand the importance of clear communication, information and appropriate support services for older people who wish to remain at home, and their caregivers.
Keyword older people
Ageing-in-place
residential care
decision-making
Nursing home placement
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Discipline of General Practice Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 09 Apr 2010, 00:37:20 EST by Dr Hugh Senior on behalf of School of Medicine