Spinal reflexes in the long-tailed stingray, Himantura fai

Kitchener, Peter D. and Snow, Peter J. (2010) Spinal reflexes in the long-tailed stingray, Himantura fai. Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology, 196 4: 263-270. doi:10.1007/s00359-010-0512-x


Author Kitchener, Peter D.
Snow, Peter J.
Title Spinal reflexes in the long-tailed stingray, Himantura fai
Formatted title
Spinal reflexes in the long-tailed stingray, Himantura fai
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0340-7594
1432-1351
Publication date 2010-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00359-010-0512-x
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 196
Issue 4
Start page 263
End page 270
Total pages 8
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
320700 Neurosciences
060604 Comparative Physiology
Abstract We have exploited the segregation of motor and sensory axons into peripheral nerve sub-compartments to examine spinal reflex interactions in anaesthetized stingrays. Single, supra-maximal electrical stimuli delivered to segmental sensory nerves elicited compound action potentials in the motor nerves of the stimulated segment and in rostral and caudal segmental motor nerves. Compound action potentials elicited in segmental motor nerves by single stimuli delivered to sensory nerves were increased severalfold by prior stimulation of adjacent sensory nerves. This facilitation of the segmental reflex produced by intense conditioning stimuli decreased as it was applied to more remote segments, to approximately the same degree in up to seven segments in the rostral and caudal direction. In contrast, an asymmetric response was revealed when test and conditioning stimuli were delivered to different nerves, neither of which was of the same segment as the recorded motor nerve: in this configuration, conditioning volleys generally inhibited the responses of motoneurons to stimuli delivered to more caudally located sensory nerves. This suggests that circuitry subserving trans-segmental interactions between spinal afferents is present in stingrays and that interneuronal connections attenuate the influence that subsequent activity in caudal primary afferents can have on the motor elements. © Springer, Part of Springer Science+Business Media
Keyword Stingray
Elasmobranch
Primary afferents
Reflex
Locomotion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 04 Apr 2010, 10:03:53 EST