The use of pain scales for people unable to verbalise in residential aged care facilities

Parker, Deborah and Abbey, Jenny (2007). The use of pain scales for people unable to verbalise in residential aged care facilities. In: CPCRE Research Conference 2007, Brisbane, Australia, (). June 2007.


Author Parker, Deborah
Abbey, Jenny
Title of paper The use of pain scales for people unable to verbalise in residential aged care facilities
Conference name CPCRE Research Conference 2007
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates June 2007
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Fully published paper
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Aims: The aim of this paper is to report results relating to the use of pain scales in Australian Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) for people unable to verbalise. A recent report from the Australian Pain Society and Australian Pain Relief Association1 indicated that ‘there is a growing international concern over the apparent inadequacy of current pain assessment and management techniquresidential care sector and particularly in those with dementia and impaired communication skills’. In 2005, the Australian Pain Society tested the Abbey pain scale and the Pain Assessment IN Advanced Dementia scale (PAINAD) indicating they were both reliable and valid instruments for this population.
Method: Surveys were distributed to 2,523 RACFs throughout Australia.
Results: A total of 598 surveys were returned, a response rate of 28%. The most commonly used pain assessment tools were the Abbey Pain Scale (65.4%) and Checklist of Non-Verbal Indicators (32.2%). The PAINAD was only used by 5% of respondents.
All questions for the Abbey scale were rated as helpful in particular change in facial expression (90.6%), body language (88.3%) and behavioural change (88.3%).
All questions in the PAINAD scale were rated as helpful in particular change in facial expression (89.5%) and body language (89.6%). While these results only represent a small sample of RACFs it is evident that pain scales for residents unable to verbalise are used in practice with the Abbey pain scale most popular.
Subjects 1110 Nursing
Keyword Pain scales
Australian Residential Aged Care Facilities
Abbey pain scale
Pain Assessment IN Advanced Dementia scale (PAINAD)
Q-Index Code EX

 
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Created: Tue, 09 Mar 2010, 20:27:38 EST by June Temby on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences