[Retracted publication] Dendrimer nanocarriers as versatile vectors in gene delivery

Dutta, Tathagata, Jain, Narendra K., McMillan, Nigel A.J. and Parekh, Harendra S. (2009) [Retracted publication] Dendrimer nanocarriers as versatile vectors in gene delivery. Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine, 6 1: 25-34. doi:10.1016/j.nano.2009.05.005

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NOTE: This article has been retracted.
Author Dutta, Tathagata
Jain, Narendra K.
McMillan, Nigel A.J.
Parekh, Harendra S.
Title [Retracted publication] Dendrimer nanocarriers as versatile vectors in gene delivery
Journal name Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1549-9634
1549-9642
Publication date 2009-02-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.nano.2009.05.005
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 1
Start page 25
End page 34
Total pages 10
Editor C. Wei
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject C1
111204 Cancer Therapy (excl. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy)
100703 Nanobiotechnology
100401 Gene and Molecular Therapy
920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
Abstract The successful delivery of nucleic acids to particular target sites is the challenge that is being addressed using a variety of viral and nonviral delivery systems, both of which have distinct advantages and disadvantages. Nonviral vectors offer the advantage of safety and flexibility over viral vectors, although they lack efficiency. Dendrimers are novel, three-dimensional polymers that have the ability to interact with various forms of nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotides, and RNA to form complexes that protect the nucleic acid from degradation. The interaction between the dendrimers and the nucleic acids is purely electrostatic where the cationic dendrimer condenses the anionic nucleic acids. Because cell membranes are negatively charged, the net positive charge of the dendrimer nucleic acid complex determines the transfection efficiency, although highly cationic systems are also cytotoxic. The nature of the dendrimer nucleic acid complex depends on various factors like stoichiometry, concentration of dendrimer-amines and nucleic acid-phosphates, as well as bulk solvent properties like pH, salt concentration, buffer strength, and dynamics of mixing. This article aims to review the role of dendrimers as novel gene delivery vectors both in vitro and in vivo. Dendrimer-based transfection reagents have become routine tools for in vitro transfection, but in vivo delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids remains a challenge.
Formatted abstract
The successful delivery of nucleic acids to particular target sites is the challenge that is being addressed using a variety of viral and nonviral delivery systems, both of which have distinct advantages and disadvantages. Nonviral vectors offer the advantage of safety and flexibility over viral vectors, although they lack efficiency. Dendrimers are novel, three-dimensional polymers that have the ability to interact with various forms of nucleic acids such as plasmid DNA, antisense oligonucleotides, and RNA to form complexes that protect the nucleic acid from degradation. The interaction between the dendrimers and the nucleic acids is purely electrostatic where the cationic dendrimer condenses the anionic nucleic acids. Because cell membranes are negatively charged, the net positive charge of the dendrimer nucleic acid complex determines the transfection efficiency, although highly cationic systems are also cytotoxic. The nature of the dendrimer nucleic acid complex depends on various factors like stoichiometry, concentration of dendrimer-amines and nucleic acid-phosphates, as well as bulk solvent properties like pH, salt concentration, buffer strength, and dynamics of mixing. This article aims to review the role of dendrimers as novel gene delivery vectors both in vitro and in vivo. Dendrimer-based transfection reagents have become routine tools for in vitro transfection, but in vivo delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids remains a challenge.

From the Clinical Editor: This review discusses the role of dendrimers as novel gene delivery vectors both in vitro and in vivo. Dendrimer based transfection reagents have become routine tools for in vitro transfection but in vivo delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids remains a challenge.
Keyword Dendrimer
Dendriplex
Non-viral vectors
Gene Delivery
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 09 Mar 2010, 19:17:38 EST by Ms Diana Cassidy on behalf of School of Pharmacy