Self-determination as a moderator of demands and control: Implications for employee strain and engagement

Parker, SL, Jimmieson, NL and Amiot, CE (2010) Self-determination as a moderator of demands and control: Implications for employee strain and engagement. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 76 1: 52-67. doi:10.1016/j.jvb.2009.06.010


Author Parker, SL
Jimmieson, NL
Amiot, CE
Title Self-determination as a moderator of demands and control: Implications for employee strain and engagement
Journal name Journal of Vocational Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-8791
1095-9084
Publication date 2010-02-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jvb.2009.06.010
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 76
Issue 1
Start page 52
End page 67
Total pages 16
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Abstract Does job control act as a stress-buffer when employees' type and level of work self-determination is taken into account? It was anticipated that job control would only be stress-buffering for employees high in self-determined and low in non-self-determined work motivation. In contrast, job control would be stress-exacerbating for employees who were low in self-determined and high in non-self-determined work motivation. Employees of a health insurance organization (N = 123) completed a Survey on perceptions of role overload, job control, work self-determination, and a range of strain and engagement indicators. Results revealed that, when individuals high in self-determination perceived high job control, they experienced greater engagement (in the form of dedication to their work). In addition, when individuals high in non-self-determination perceived high job demands, they experienced more health complaints. A significant 3-way interaction demonstrated that, for individuals low in non-self-determination, high job control had the anticipated stress-buffering effect on engagement (in the form of absorption in their work). In addition, low job control was stress-exacerbating. However, contrary to expectations, for those high in non-self-determination, high job control was just as useful as low job control as a stress-buffer. The practical applications of these findings to the organizational context are discussed. (C) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
Does job control act as a stress-buffer when employees' type and level of work self-determination is taken into account? It was anticipated that job control would only be stress-buffering for employees high in self-determined and low in non-self-determined work motivation. In contrast, job control would be stress-exacerbating for employees who were low in self-determined and high in non-self-determined work motivation. Employees of a health insurance organization (N = 123) completed a survey on perceptions of role overload, job control, work self-determination, and a range of strain and engagement indicators. Results revealed that, when individuals high in self-determination perceived high job control, they experienced greater engagement (in the form of dedication to their work). In addition, when individuals high in non-self-determination perceived high job demands, they experienced more health complaints. A significant 3-way interaction demonstrated that, for individuals low in non-self-determination, high job control had the anticipated stress-buffering effect on engagement (in the form of absorption in their work). In addition, low job control was stress-exacerbating. However, contrary to expectations, for those high in non-self-determination, high job control was just as useful as low job control as a stress-buffer. The practical applications of these findings to the organizational context are discussed. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Demand
Control
Self-determination
Person-Environment Fit
Strain
Engagement
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article available online 30 June 2009.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 39 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 46 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 07 Mar 2010, 10:02:36 EST