Seed longevity can be changed by the pre-zygotic parental environment

Kochanek, Jitka, Steadman, Kathryn J., Probert, Robin J. and Adkins, Steve W. (2008). Seed longevity can be changed by the pre-zygotic parental environment. In: Australasian Plant Conservation. ANPC Seventh National Conference: Our Declining Flora – Tackling the Threats, Mulgoa, N.S.W., Australia, (2-2). 21-24 April 2008.

Author Kochanek, Jitka
Steadman, Kathryn J.
Probert, Robin J.
Adkins, Steve W.
Title of paper Seed longevity can be changed by the pre-zygotic parental environment
Conference name ANPC Seventh National Conference: Our Declining Flora – Tackling the Threats
Conference location Mulgoa, N.S.W., Australia
Conference dates 21-24 April 2008
Proceedings title Australasian Plant Conservation
Place of Publication Canberra, Australia
Publisher Australian Network for Plant Conservation
Publication Year 2008
ISSN 1039-6500
Volume 17
Issue 1
Start page 2
End page 2
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Understanding seed longevity is important for ex situ seedbanks that aim to conserve plant diversity and possibly also for explaining soil seedbank persistence. Thus, if seed longevity is compromised by climate change, biodiversity may also be reduced.

This paper reports a glasshouse study that investigated the effects of the pre-zygotic parental growth environment on offspring seed longevity. Two Australian native species, Wahlenbergia tumidifructa P. J. Sm. (Campanulaceae) and Plantago cunninghamii Decne. (Plantaginaceae), were grown under two soil moisture levels (wet, -0.01 MPa; dry, dried to -1 MPa, rewatered to -0.1 MPa) within two temperature regimes (high, 33/28 ± 5 °C; low, 18/13 ± 5 °C) throughout the pre-zygotic development phase. The seeds were harvested at physiological maturity, processed and the seed longevity determined. The parental phenotype was also described.

Seed longevity was affected by the parental environment for both species. However, the species reacted differently to the environments imposed. High temperatures halved the seed longevity for both species, but drought halved seed longevity only for W. tumidifructa and had no effect on P. cunninghamii. Also for W. tumidifructa high temperatures resulted in smaller plants that reproduced sooner and the corresponding seed-lots deteriorated more rapidly. These findings may be particularly relevant in the context of climate change since high temperatures and/or dry pre-zygotic conditions reduced the seed longevity for both species.
Subjects 0607 Plant Biology
Keyword Seed longegivity
Biodiversity
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Thu, 25 Feb 2010, 23:32:03 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of Faculty Of Nat Resources, Agric & Veterinary Sc