Advanced paternal age is associated with alterations in discrete behavioural domains and cortical neuroanatomy of C57BL/6J mice

Foldi, Claire J., Eyles, Darryl W., McGrath, John J. and Burne, Thomas H. J. (2010) Advanced paternal age is associated with alterations in discrete behavioural domains and cortical neuroanatomy of C57BL/6J mice. European Journal of Neuroscience, 31 3: 556-564. doi:10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07074.x


Author Foldi, Claire J.
Eyles, Darryl W.
McGrath, John J.
Burne, Thomas H. J.
Title Advanced paternal age is associated with alterations in discrete behavioural domains and cortical neuroanatomy of C57BL/6J mice
Journal name European Journal of Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0953-816X
1460-9568
1470-8566
Publication date 2010-02-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07074.x
Volume 31
Issue 3
Start page 556
End page 564
Total pages 9
Editor Jean-Marc Fritschy
Martin Sarter
Place of publication Oxford, U.K
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject 321204 Mental Health
730211 Mental health
1109 Neurosciences
1702 Cognitive Sciences
C1
Formatted abstract
Advanced paternal age (APA) is associated with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. A previous study in mice suggested that the offspring of aged sires have altered locomotion and avoidance learning. The aim of the current study was to conduct a comprehensive behavioural screen in adult offspring of mice of APA. We also examined brain morphology in neonate and adult mice. The adult offspring of 12- to18-month-old (APA) and 4-month-old (control) male C57BL/6J mice underwent a behavioural test battery comprising tests for locomotion, anxiety, exploration, social behaviour, learned helplessness and sensorimotor gating. The brains of these mice were collected at 3 months and imaged ex vivo using a 16.4T MRI scanner to assess gross neuroanatomy. Neuroanatomy was also examined at birth in a separate cohort of animals. Overall, the APA mouse model was associated with subtle behavioural changes and altered cortical morphology. The behavioural phenotype of female APA mice included increased anxiety-related behaviour, increased exploration and decreased learned helplessness compared to control females. Male APA mice had thinner cortices at birth and increased cortical volume as adults. This animal model may assist in exploring the mechanism of action linking APA with disorders such as schizophrenia and autism.
© 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Keyword Advanced paternal age
Behaviour
Cortex
Mouse
Neuroanatomy
Copy number variation
Schizophrenia epidemiology
Exploratory-behavior
Sex-differences
Knockout mice
Animal-model
Plus-maze
Autism
Risk
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under "Behavioral Neuroscience".

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 21 Feb 2010, 10:08:10 EST