Longitudinal study of speech perception, speech, and language for children with hearing loss in an auditory-verbal therapy program

Dornan, D., Hickson, L., Murdoch, B. and Houston, T. (2009) Longitudinal study of speech perception, speech, and language for children with hearing loss in an auditory-verbal therapy program. Volta Review, 109 2-3: 61-85.

Author Dornan, D.
Hickson, L.
Murdoch, B.
Houston, T.
Title Longitudinal study of speech perception, speech, and language for children with hearing loss in an auditory-verbal therapy program
Journal name Volta Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0042-8639
Publication date 2009-10-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 109
Issue 2-3
Start page 61
End page 85
Total pages 25
Editor Katie Schmitz
Place of publication USA
Publisher Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc.
Language eng
Subject 920107 Hearing, Vision, Speech and Their Disorders
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy)
C1
Abstract This study examined the speech perception, speech, and language developmental progress of 25 children with hearing loss (mean Pure-Tone Average [PTA] 79.37 dB HL) in an auditory-verbal therapy program. Children were tested initially and then 21 months later on a battery of assessments. The speech and language results over time were compared with those for a control group of children with typical hearing who were matched for initial language age, receptive vocabulary, gender, and socioeconomic level. Speech perception scores for the children with hearing loss showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) for live-voice presentations, but not for recorded voice. For both groups there was significant improvement over 21 months in scores for auditory comprehension, oral expression, total language, and articulation of consonants (p < 0.001); the amount of improvement was not significantly different between groups (p > 0.05). At the 21-month test point, 84% of the children with hearing loss scored within the typical range for total language age, compared to 58.6% at the initial assessment. Receptive vocabulary scores were an exception, with the children with typical hearing showing significantly more gain than the children with hearing loss (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, the group with hearing loss scored within the typical range for receptive vocabulary. Overall, the results show that the children with hearing loss had improved speech perception skills over time and that their rate of progress for speech and language skills was similar to that of children with typical hearing.
Keyword Education, Special
Rehabilitation
Education & Educational Research
Rehabilitation
EDUCATION, SPECIAL
REHABILITATION, SSCI
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 07 Feb 2010, 10:00:22 EST