Spatial co-distribution of neglected tropical diseases in the East African Great Lakes region: revisiting the justification for integrated control

Clements, Archie C. A., Deville, Marie-Alice, Ndayishimiye, Onésime, Brooker, Simon and Fenwick, Alan (2010) Spatial co-distribution of neglected tropical diseases in the East African Great Lakes region: revisiting the justification for integrated control. Tropical Medicine & International Health, 15 2: 198-207. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3156.2009.02440.x


Author Clements, Archie C. A.
Deville, Marie-Alice
Ndayishimiye, Onésime
Brooker, Simon
Fenwick, Alan
Title Spatial co-distribution of neglected tropical diseases in the East African Great Lakes region: revisiting the justification for integrated control
Journal name Tropical Medicine & International Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1360-2276
1365-3156
Publication date 2010-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-3156.2009.02440.x
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 15
Issue 2
Start page 198
End page 207
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract To determine spatial patterns of co-endemicity of schistosomiasis mansoni and the soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm in the Great Lakes region of East Africa, to help plan integrated neglected tropical disease programmes in this region.
Formatted abstract
Objective  To determine spatial patterns of co-endemicity of schistosomiasis mansoni and the soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm in the Great Lakes region of East Africa, to help plan integrated neglected tropical disease programmes in this region.

Method  Parasitological surveys were conducted in Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya and Burundi in 28 213 children in 404 schools. Bayesian geostatistical models were used to interpolate prevalence of these infections across the study area. Interpolated prevalence maps were overlaid to determine areas of co-endemicity.

Results  In the Great Lakes region, prevalence was 18.1% for Schistosoma mansoni, 50.0% for hookworm, 6.8% for A. lumbricoides and 6.8% for T. trichiura. Hookworm infection was ubiquitous, whereas S. mansoni, A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura were highly focal. Most areas were endemic (prevalence ≥10%) or hyperendemic (prevalence ≥50%) for one or more STHs, whereas endemic areas for schistosomiasis mansoni were restricted to foci adjacent large perennial water bodies.

Conclusion  Because of the ubiquity of hookworm, treatment programmes are required for STH throughout the region but efficient schistosomiasis control should only be targeted at limited high-risk areas. Therefore, integration of schistosomiasis with STH control is only indicated in limited foci in East Africa.  © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Keyword Schistosoma mansoni
Ascaris lumbricoides
hookworm
Trichuris trichiura
neglected tropical diseases
integrated control programmes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 081673
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 31 Jan 2010, 10:00:26 EST