EC regulation of corporate governance

Johnston, Andrew EC regulation of corporate governance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. doi:10.1017/CBO9780511770753

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Johnston, Andrew
Title EC regulation of corporate governance
Place of Publication Cambridge
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication year 2009
Sub-type Research book (original research)
DOI 10.1017/CBO9780511770753
Open Access Status DOI
ISBN 978-0-521-87667-4
Language eng
Start page 1
End page 400
Total number of pages 400
Subjects A1
180109 Corporations and Associations Law
949999 Law, Politics and Community Services not elsewhere classified
Abstract/Summary Andrew Johnston examines EC regulation of national corporate governance systems through the lenses of economic theory and reflexive governance. By contrasting the normative demands of the neoclassical ‘agency’ model with those of the productive coalition model, he shows how their incompatibility required political compromise. Reflexive governance theory is then used to explain how progress has been possible. Through detailed analysis of both case law and positive regulation, the author highlights the move from positive to negative integration; the benefits as well as the limits of regulatory competition; and the significant role of reflexive techniques in both preventing market failure and enabling positive integration to proceed. The workable compromise that has emerged between market integration and continued regulatory diversity at national level demonstrates that procedural regulation can steer autonomous social subsystems towards greater responsibility and a better articulation of the public good.
Q-Index Code A1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 20 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 10 Dec 2009, 02:57:12 EST by Vivianne Mulder on behalf of T.C. Beirne School of Law