Impact of health, treatment and psychological factors on cognitive functioning after chemotherapy for early breast cancer

Vearncombe, Katharine Jean and Pachana, Nancy A. (2009) Impact of health, treatment and psychological factors on cognitive functioning after chemotherapy for early breast cancer. Australian Psychologist, 44 4: 235-247. doi:10.1080/00050060903096652


Author Vearncombe, Katharine Jean
Pachana, Nancy A.
Title Impact of health, treatment and psychological factors on cognitive functioning after chemotherapy for early breast cancer
Journal name Australian Psychologist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-9544
0005-0067
Publication date 2009-12-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00050060903096652
Volume 44
Issue 4
Start page 235
End page 247
Total pages 13
Editor Nancy A. Pachana
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd.
Language eng
Subject C1
170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
Abstract The aim of the current study was to review the extent that physical health, treatment and psychological factors contribute to cognitive dysfunction after chemotherapy for breast cancer. PubMed, Medline and PsychINFO searches of the literature published from 1995 to 2008 pertaining to chemotherapy for breast cancer and cognitive dysfunction were reviewed. There is currently insufficient evidence available to evaluate the effect of indirect factors (health, treatment and psychological) on cognitive functioning after chemotherapy. Fatigue and changes in endocrine function are the most frequently investigated factors, although conclusions are limited due to methodological shortcomings. The impact of other health and treatment factors has been inadequately addressed, with many variables examined in only one of the 22 reviewed studies. Importantly, although depression and anxiety can significantly influence neuropsychological test performance, mood has been inconsistently measured and analysed in regards to cognitive performance in this literature. In addition, indirect factors may affect cognitive domains differently, requiring further investigation of specific domains after chemotherapy. Because chemotherapy can negatively affect numerous organ systems and as yet no systematic investigations of health, treatment or psychological factors have been conducted, the authors conclude that it is currently premature to attribute all cognitive change after chemotherapy treatment to cytotoxic drugs.
Keyword Cancer
chemotherapy
cognitive function
neuropsychological assessment
neurotoxicity
oncology
Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy
High-Dose Chemotherapy
Menopausal Symptoms
Follow-Up
Fatigue
Women
Impairment
Survivors
Therapy
Carcinoma
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 22 Nov 2009, 10:08:09 EST