Gaze and arrow cueing of attention reveals individual differences along the autism-spectrum as a function of target context

Bayliss, Andrew P. and Tipper, Steven P. (2005) Gaze and arrow cueing of attention reveals individual differences along the autism-spectrum as a function of target context. British Journal of Psychology, 96 1: 95-114. doi:10.1348/000712604X15626


Author Bayliss, Andrew P.
Tipper, Steven P.
Title Gaze and arrow cueing of attention reveals individual differences along the autism-spectrum as a function of target context
Journal name British Journal of Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-1269
2044-8295
Publication date 2005-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1348/000712604X15626
Volume 96
Issue 1
Start page 95
End page 114
Total pages 20
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Subject 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Observing averted gaze results in a reflexive shift of attention to the gazed-at location.In two experiments, participants scoring high and low on the Autism-Spectrum Quotient questionnaire (AQ; Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, Skinner, Martin, & Clubley,2001) observed arrow and gaze cues to investigate cueing effect magnitude as a function of the context in which peripheral targets could appear. While identical cueing effects were found with gaze and arrow cues, the more striking results concerned target stimuli. In Experiment 1, targets could appear on a peripheral face, or on scrambled face parts. Overall, greater cueing effects were found when the target appeared on a face.However, this face bias was only observed in participants with low AQ scores, whereas high AQ scorers oriented more to scrambled features. Experiment 2 found equal cueing to targets appearing on tools, as compared with tool parts. However, individual differences were again observed, where low AQ scorers showed larger cueing towards tools, while high scorers oriented more to scrambled parts, as in Experiment 1. These results support the idea that low AQ individuals orient strongly to objects attended by others. However, since the same results were found for arrow cues, this effect may generalize to all central cues to attention. High AQ scorers possessing many more autistic-like traits tended to orient more to scrambled shapes, perhaps reflecting a bias for orienting to local details.
Keyword Autism
Cueing effects
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 31 DEC 2010

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 12 Nov 2009, 22:31:44 EST by Dr Andrew Bayliss on behalf of School of Psychology