Asymmetry of genetic variation in fitness-related traits: Apparent stabilizing selection on g(max)

McGuigan, Katrina and Blows, Mark W. (2009) Asymmetry of genetic variation in fitness-related traits: Apparent stabilizing selection on g(max). Evolution, 63 11: 2838-2847. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00759.x


Author McGuigan, Katrina
Blows, Mark W.
Title Asymmetry of genetic variation in fitness-related traits: Apparent stabilizing selection on g(max)
Formatted title
Asymmetry of genetic variation in fitness-related traits: Apparent stabilizing selection on gmax
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-3820
1558-5646
Publication date 2009-11-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00759.x
Open Access Status
Volume 63
Issue 11
Start page 2838
End page 2847
Total pages 10
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley- Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject C1
060303 Biological Adaptation
060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
Formatted abstract
The maintenance of genetic variation in traits closely associated with fitness remains a key unresolved issue in evolutionary genetics. One important qualification on the observation of genetic variation in fitness-related traits is that such traits respond asymmetrically to selection, evolving to a greater extent in the direction of lower fitness. Here we test the hypothesis that standing genetic variation in fitness-related traits is principally maintained for unfit phenotypes. Male Drosophila bunnanda vary in mating success (the primary determinant of male fitness) due to female mate choice. We used competitive mating success to partitioning males into two groups: successful (high fitness) and unsuccessful (low fitness). Relative to successful males, unsuccessful males harbored considerably greater levels of additive genetic variation for sexual signaling traits. This genetic asymmetry was detected for a multivariate trait that we demonstrated was not directly under stabilizing sexual selection, leading us to conclude the trait was under apparent stabilizing selection. Consequently, our results suggest genetic variance might be biased toward low fitness even for traits that are not themselves the direct targets of selection. Simple metrics of genetic variance are unlikely to be adequate descriptors of the complex nature of the genetic basis of traits under selection.


Keyword Cuticular hydrocarbons
Drosophila bunnanda
Genetic asymmetry
Mating success
Mutation bias
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 15 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 12 Nov 2009, 21:53:55 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Biological Sciences