Analysis of soil carbon outcomes from interaction between climate and grazing pressure in Australian rangelands using Range-ASSESS

Hill, Michael J., Roxburgh, Stephen H., McKeon, Greg M., Carter, John O. and Barrett, Damian J. (2006) Analysis of soil carbon outcomes from interaction between climate and grazing pressure in Australian rangelands using Range-ASSESS. Environmental Modelling & Software, 21 6: 779-801. doi:10.1016/j.envsoft.2005.02.006


Author Hill, Michael J.
Roxburgh, Stephen H.
McKeon, Greg M.
Carter, John O.
Barrett, Damian J.
Title Analysis of soil carbon outcomes from interaction between climate and grazing pressure in Australian rangelands using Range-ASSESS
Journal name Environmental Modelling & Software   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1364-8152
Publication date 2006-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.envsoft.2005.02.006
Volume 21
Issue 6
Start page 779
End page 801
Total pages 23
Place of publication Oxford, UK ; New York, NY
Publisher Elsevier Science
Language eng
Abstract This paper uses a scenario analysis system - Range-ASSESS - to examine the potential for gains and losses of soil carbon in the Australian rangelands as affected by grazing and climate. The analysis involves a factorial examination of the effect of stocking rates and all possible 5-year historical climates between 1889 and 1999. The analysis also looks at the sensitivity of results to the method of calculation of safe carrying capacity, and to the thresholds used to calculate grazing and dryness indices that drive transitions in state and transition models. The analysis showed that different vegetation zones produced different responses to changes in stocking depending upon the spatial distribution of dryness index, nature of carbon state and transition model, rules governing transitions, and relative significance of soil carbon. At a stocking density equivalent to 100% of 1997 levels, the soil carbon loss from rangelands was about 400 Mt C in 40% of the 5-year periods using a sensitive growth deviation threshold to determine dryness index. If a less sensitive threshold was used, potential loss was reduced to about 200 Mt C. If the grazing pressure threshold for a grazing index of four is adjusted to a more generous level, then potential losses in the dry periods are substantially reduced. The analysis is intended to be indicative of a likely approximate outcome rather than a quantitative measure of system response. The results indicate that the interpretation of the effect of the drought-grazing pressure interaction on perennial plant survival, and consequent organic carbon input to soils, is a major source of uncertainty and a critical area for more experimental measurement. (C) 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword carbon sequestration
rangelands
spatial tool
state and transition model
soil carbon
grazing
TRANSITION MODELS
NORTHERN AUSTRALIA
SPEARGRASS ZONE
STATE
SEQUESTRATION
QUEENSLAND
MANAGEMENT
GRASS
COMMUNITY
SAVANNA
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Sustainable Minerals Institute Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 11 Nov 2009, 22:45:32 EST