The effects of incubation temperature on the morphology and composition of Australian Brush-turkey (Alectura lathami) chicks

Eiby, Y.A and Booth, D.T. (2009) The effects of incubation temperature on the morphology and composition of Australian Brush-turkey (Alectura lathami) chicks. Journal of Comparative Physiology B, 179 7: 875-882. doi:10.1007/s00360-009-0370-4


Author Eiby, Y.A
Booth, D.T.
Title The effects of incubation temperature on the morphology and composition of Australian Brush-turkey (Alectura lathami) chicks
Formatted title
The effects of incubation temperature on the morphology and composition of Australian Brush-turkey (Alectura lathami) chicks
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology B   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0174-1578
Publication date 2009-05-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00360-009-0370-4
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 179
Issue 7
Start page 875
End page 882
Total pages 8
Editor Gerhard Heldmaier
Place of publication Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
060806 Animal Physiological Ecology
Abstract Environmental heterogeneity during embryonic development generates an important source of variation in offspring phenotypes and can influence the evolution of life histories. The effects of incubation temperature on offspring phenotypes in reptiles has been well documented but remains relatively unexplored in birds as their embryos typically develop over a narrow range of temperatures. Megapode birds (Order Galliformes; Family Megapodiidae) are unique in that their embryos tolerate and develop over a wide range of incubation temperatures, yet little is known of the effect that temperature has on hatchling morphology and composition. Australian Brush-turkey eggs collected on the day of laying were incubated in the laboratory under constant temperatures of 32, 34 and 36°C until hatching in order to determine the influence of temperature on hatchling mass, size and composition. The dry mass of the yolk-free body and residual yolk of hatchlings were temperature dependent, such that higher temperatures produced chicks of lesser yolk-free body mass and greater residual yolk mass than chicks incubated at lower temperatures. However the overall size (linear dimensions) and lipid, protein and ash content of chicks were independent of temperature.
Keyword Incubation temperature
Hatchling
Morphology
Lipid
Protein
Megapode birds
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 10 Nov 2009, 23:46:12 EST by Hayley Ware on behalf of School of Biological Sciences