Oscillations in the basolateral amygdala: aversive stimulation is state dependent and resets the oscillatory phase

Crane, James W., Windels, Francois and Sah, Pankaj (2009) Oscillations in the basolateral amygdala: aversive stimulation is state dependent and resets the oscillatory phase. Journal Neurophysiology, 102 3: 1379-1387. doi:10.1152/jn.00438.2009


Author Crane, James W.
Windels, Francois
Sah, Pankaj
Title Oscillations in the basolateral amygdala: aversive stimulation is state dependent and resets the oscillatory phase
Journal name Journal Neurophysiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3077
1522-1598
Publication date 2009-07-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1152/jn.00438.2009
Open Access Status
Volume 102
Issue 3
Start page 1379
End page 1387
Total pages 9
Editor Linden, David
Place of publication Untied States
Publisher American Physiological Sociely
Language eng
Subject C1
1109 Neurosciences
920111 Nervous System and Disorders
Abstract Crane JW, Windels F, Sah P. Oscillations in the basolateral amygdala: aversive stimulation is state dependent and resets the oscillatory phase. J Neurophysiol 102: 1379-1387, 2009. First published July 1, 2009; doi: 10.1152/jn.00438.2009. Slow oscillations (<1 Hz) in neural activity occur during sleep and quiet wakefulness in both animals and humans. Here we show that in urethan-anesthetized animals, neurons in the basolateral amygdala in vivo display a slow oscillation between resting membrane potential (down-state) and depolarized potentials (up-states) occurring at a frequency of similar to 0.3 Hz. This oscillation is insensitive to the holding potential and continues unabated under voltage clamp, indicating that up-states are synaptically driven. Somatosensory stimulation (footshock) delivered during the down-state evoked an all-or-none transition into an up-state. When delivered during down-states, footshocks triggered up-states and reset the phase of the neural oscillation, effectively synchronizing activity in the basolateral amygdala. This phase reset was reproduced by posterior thalamus stimulation, confirming that it was mediated by aversive sensory input. In contrast, a footshock delivered during the up-state was ineffective in stimulating BLA neurons. We conclude that oscillatory activity in the basolateral amygdala is driven by ensembles of cortical neurons. These ensembles gate the response of amygdala neurons to aversive stimulation in a state-dependent manner. Aversive stimulation is effective when the network is in the down-state but ineffective when the network is in an up-state.
Keyword Neurosciences
Physiology
Neurosciences & Neurology
Physiology
NEUROSCIENCES
PHYSIOLOGY
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 16 Oct 2009, 22:01:37 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute