Understanding the mechanisms of callosal development through the use of transgenic mouse models

Donahoo, Amber-Lee and Richards, Linda J. (2009) Understanding the mechanisms of callosal development through the use of transgenic mouse models. Seminars in Pediatric Neurology, 16 3: 127-142. doi:10.1016/j.spen.2009.07.003


Author Donahoo, Amber-Lee
Richards, Linda J.
Title Understanding the mechanisms of callosal development through the use of transgenic mouse models
Journal name Seminars in Pediatric Neurology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1071-9091
1558-0776
Publication date 2009-09-22
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.spen.2009.07.003
Open Access Status
Volume 16
Issue 3
Start page 127
End page 142
Total pages 16
Editor Bodensteiner, John B
Place of publication United States
Publisher W.B. Saunders & Co
Language eng
Subject C1
110903 Central Nervous System
110902 Cellular Nervous System
920111 Nervous System and Disorders
Abstract The cerebral cortex is the area of the brain where higher-order cognitive processing occurs. The 2 hemispheres of the cerebral cortex communicate through one of the largest fiber tracts in the brain, the corpus callosum. Malformation of the corpus callosum in human beings occurs in 1 in 4000 live births, and those afflicted experience an extensive range of neurologic disorders, from relatively mild to severe cognitive deficits. Understanding the molecular and cellular processes involved in these disorders would therefore assist in the development of prognostic tools and therapies. During the past 3 decades, mouse models have been used extensively to determine which molecules play a role in the complex regulation of corpus callosum development. This review provides an update on these studies, as well as highlights the value of using mouse models with the goal of developing therapies for human acallosal syndromes.
Keyword Clinical Neurology
Pediatrics
Neurosciences & Neurology
Pediatrics
CLINICAL NEUROLOGY
PEDIATRICS
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 30 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 32 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 16 Oct 2009, 00:44:46 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute