Using trauma injury severity score (TRISS) variables to predict length of hospital stay following trauma in New Zealand

Schluter, Philip J., Cameron, Cate M., Davey, Tamzyn M., Civil, Ian, Orchard, Jodie, Dansey, Rangi, Hamill, James, Naylor, Helen, James, Carolyn, Dorrian, Jenny, Christey, Grant, Pollard, Clifford and McClure, Rod J. (2009) Using trauma injury severity score (TRISS) variables to predict length of hospital stay following trauma in New Zealand. New Zealand Medical Journal, 122 1302: 65-78.

Author Schluter, Philip J.
Cameron, Cate M.
Davey, Tamzyn M.
Civil, Ian
Orchard, Jodie
Dansey, Rangi
Hamill, James
Naylor, Helen
James, Carolyn
Dorrian, Jenny
Christey, Grant
Pollard, Clifford
McClure, Rod J.
Title Using trauma injury severity score (TRISS) variables to predict length of hospital stay following trauma in New Zealand
Journal name New Zealand Medical Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1175-8716
Publication date 2009-09-11
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 122
Issue 1302
Start page 65
End page 78
Total pages 14
Place of publication Christchurch, New Zealand
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Language eng
Subject C1
111706 Epidemiology
920409 Injury Control
Formatted abstract
Aim. To develop and assess the predictive capabilities of a statistical model that relates routinely collected Trauma Injury Severity Score (TRISS) variables to length of hospital stay (LOS) in survivors of traumatic injury.

Method
. Retrospective cohort study of adults who sustained a serious traumatic injury, and who survived until discharge from Auckland City, Middlemore, Waikato, or North Shore Hospitals between 2002 and 2006. Cubic-root transformed LOS was analysed using two-level mixed-effects regression models.

Results. 1498 eligible patients were identified, 1446 (97%) injured from a blunt mechanism and 52 (3%) from a penetrating mechanism. For blunt mechanism trauma, 1096 (76%) were male, average age was 37 years (range: 15–94 years), and LOS and TRISS score information was available for 1362 patients. Spearman’s correlation and the median absolute prediction error between LOS and the original TRISS model was
p=0.31 and 10.8 days, respectively, and between LOS and the final multivariable two level mixed-effects regression model was p=0.38 and 6.0 days, respectively. Insufficient data were available for the analysis of penetrating mechanism models.

Conclusions. Neither the original TRISS model nor the refined model has sufficient ability to accurately or reliably predict LOS. Additional predictor variables for LOS and other indicators for morbidity need to be considered.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 14 Oct 2009, 00:31:56 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work