Genetic variability and population differentiation inferred from DNA finger-printing in silvereyes (Aves: Zosteropidae)

Degnan, Sandie M. (1993) Genetic variability and population differentiation inferred from DNA finger-printing in silvereyes (Aves: Zosteropidae). Evolution, 47 4: 1105-1117. doi:10.2307/2409978


Author Degnan, Sandie M.
Title Genetic variability and population differentiation inferred from DNA finger-printing in silvereyes (Aves: Zosteropidae)
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-3820
1558-5646
Publication date 1993-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2307/2409978
Volume 47
Issue 4
Start page 1105
End page 1117
Total pages 13
Place of publication Lancaster, PA.
Publisher Society for the Study of Evolution
Language eng
Subject 060302 Biogeography and Phylogeography
060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Abstract This study evaluated DNA fingerprinting as a tool for estimating population genetic diversity and differentiation by comparing minisatellite variation in island and mainland popu- lations of silvereyes (Aves: Zosterops lateralis). Three populations with different recent histories were compared: (1) Heron Island and neighbonng islands, colonized 3000 to 4000 yr ago; (2) Lady Elliot Island, colonized within the past two decades; and (3) an adjacent mainland population, which presumably has existed for thousands of years. The degree of genetic variability within the three populations reflected both their size and the time since their colonization. Minisatellite diversity was highest in the mainland population, intermediate in the Capricorn Island group (which was shown to represent a single admixture), and lowest in the Lady Elliot Island population, possibly because of a recent population bottleneck during colonization. Mean band sharing between any two populations was less than the mean within either of those populations, and four fingerprint bands common to island birds were rare or absent in the fingerprints of mainland birds. In the absence of significant gene flow between the mainland and the islands, the populations have apparently become distinct at minisatellite loci, as evidenced by differences in both allelic diversity and in the frequencies of specific fragments. Within the Heron Island population, cohort analyses demonstrated the temporal stability of the fingerprint profile over 6 yr. This study demonstrates that length polymorphisms at minisatellite loci may be stable enough over time to retain information about recent historical and demographic effects on the relative genetic variability and differentiation of small, closely related populations.
Keyword DNA fingerprinting
genetic diversity
island populations
population structure
sil- vereye
zosterops lateralis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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