Explaining networks through mechanisms: Vaccination, priming and the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease crisis

Hindmoor, Andrew (2009) Explaining networks through mechanisms: Vaccination, priming and the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease crisis. Political Studies, 57 1: 75-94. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9248.2008.00725.x

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Author Hindmoor, Andrew
Title Explaining networks through mechanisms: Vaccination, priming and the 2001 Foot and Mouth disease crisis
Journal name Political Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0032-3217
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-9248.2008.00725.x
Volume 57
Issue 1
Start page 75
End page 94
Total pages 20
Editor Rene Bailey
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Subject 360200 Policy and Administration
C1
750600 Government and Politics
9402 Government and Politics
1605 Policy and Administration
Abstract There is an ongoing debate about whether and how the existence of policy networks can be used to explain policy outcomes. Making use of the concept of priming, it is argued here that network structures create differential opportunities for interest groups to persuade decision makers to act in particular ways. In conditions of uncertainty where there is a pressure to take immediate decisions, priming can help us to understand why some groups are more persuasive than others. This argument is developed against the backdrop of a particular puzzle: the British government’s refusal to use emergency vaccination during the outbreak of foot and mouth disease in 2001. This decision is routinely accounted for in terms of the bargaining strength of the National Farmers Union. Against this it is argued that farmers’ influence over government policy ought to be explained primarily in terms of the way they were able to prime particular arguments and so help persuade the government to act in particular ways.
Keyword Policy networks
Policy outcomes
Priming
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online: 29 Apr 2008

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
ERA 2012 Admin Only
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 18 Sep 2009, 19:03:45 EST by Elmari Louise Whyte on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies