Development of the pharyngeal dentition of two herbivorous halfbeaks (Teleostei : Hemiramphidae) and implications for the hemiramphid ontogenetic trophic shift

Tibbetts, Ian R., Day, Ryan D. and Carseldine, Lee (2008) Development of the pharyngeal dentition of two herbivorous halfbeaks (Teleostei : Hemiramphidae) and implications for the hemiramphid ontogenetic trophic shift. Marine & Freshwater Research, 59 2: 117-124. doi:10.1071/MF07026


Author Tibbetts, Ian R.
Day, Ryan D.
Carseldine, Lee
Title Development of the pharyngeal dentition of two herbivorous halfbeaks (Teleostei : Hemiramphidae) and implications for the hemiramphid ontogenetic trophic shift
Journal name Marine & Freshwater Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1323-1650
1448-6059
Publication date 2008-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MF07026
Volume 59
Issue 2
Start page 117
End page 124
Total pages 8
Editor A. J. Boulton
K. Hunter
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Language eng
Subject 0603 Evolutionary Biology
050102 Ecosystem Function
Abstract Development of the pharyngeal dentition of two herbivorous halfbeaks, Hyporhamphus regularis ardelio (Whitley, 1931) and Arrhamphus sclerolepis krefftii (Steindachner, 1867), was examined quantitatively to assess features that might confer their ability to shift their diet from animal to plant material. Toothed area, tooth number, maximum tooth diameter and tooth wear area in both pharyngeal tooth pads of both taxa increased with ontogeny, whereas tooth density decreased. Comparing individuals of the two taxa at similar standard lengths indicated that A. sclerolepis krefftii showed hypertrophy of the majority of pharyngeal characters in relation to H. regularis ardelio of a similar standard length. That A. sclerolepis krefftii is more developmentally advanced than H. regularis ardelio in almost all dentigerous characters studied indicates that pharyngeal development may allow the former to commence herbivory at a smaller standard length than the latter species. The evolutionary and ecological implications of these findings are discussed in the context of a group of fishes that is overexploited worldwide.
Keyword Enameloid
Mechanical digestion
Ontogeny
Tooth replacement
Wear surface
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Ecology Centre Publications
Centre for Marine Studies Publications
 
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