Interpreting risks and ratios in therapy trials

Scott, I. (2008) Interpreting risks and ratios in therapy trials. Australian Prescriber, 31 1: 12-16. doi:10.18773/austprescr.2008.008

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Author Scott, I.
Title Interpreting risks and ratios in therapy trials
Journal name Australian Prescriber   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0312-8008
1839-3942
Publication date 2008-02-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.18773/austprescr.2008.008
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 31
Issue 1
Start page 12
End page 16
Total pages 5
Place of publication Deakin, ACT, Australia
Publisher National Prescribing Service
Language eng
Abstract To appreciate the significance of clinical trial results, clinicians need to understand the mathematical language used to describe treatment effects. When comparing intervention and control groups in a trial, results may be reported in terms of relative or absolute risk (or probability), or as more statistically sophisticated entities based on odds and hazard ratios. When events in the intervention group are significantly less frequent than in the control group, then relative risk, odds ratio and hazard ratio (and their confidence intervals) will be less than 1.0. If the converse holds true, these values will be greater than 1.0.
Formatted abstract
To appreciate the significance of clinical trial results, clinicians need to understand the mathematical language used to describe treatment effects. When comparing intervention and control groups in a trial, results may be reported in terms of relative or absolute risk (or probability), or as more statistically sophisticated entities based on odds and hazard ratios. When events in the intervention group are significantly less frequent than in the control group, then relative risk, odds ratio and hazard ratio (and their confidence intervals) will be less than 1.0. If the converse holds true, these values will be greater than 1.0.
Keyword Clinical trials
Pressure
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 19:46:31 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Medicine