Non-lethal effects of an invasive species in the marine environment: the importance of early life-history stages

Rius, Marc, Turon, Xavier and Marshall, Dustin J. (2009) Non-lethal effects of an invasive species in the marine environment: the importance of early life-history stages. Oecologia, 159 4: 873-882. doi:10.1007/s00442-008-1256-y


Author Rius, Marc
Turon, Xavier
Marshall, Dustin J.
Title Non-lethal effects of an invasive species in the marine environment: the importance of early life-history stages
Journal name Oecologia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0029-8549
Publication date 2009-04-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00442-008-1256-y
Open Access Status
Volume 159
Issue 4
Start page 873
End page 882
Total pages 10
Editor Koerner, C.
Place of publication Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject C1
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl. Marine Ichthyology)
960402 Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Coastal and Estuarine Environments
Formatted abstract
Studies examining the eVects of invasive
species have focussed traditionally on the direct/lethal
eVects of the invasive on the native community but there is
a growing recognition that invasive species may also have
non-lethal eVects. In terrestrial systems, non-lethal eVects
of invasive species can disrupt early life-history phases
(such as fertilisation, dispersal and subsequent establishment)
of native species, but in the marine environment
most studies focus on adult rather than early life-history
stages. Here, we examine the potential for an introduced
sessile marine invertebrate (Styela plicata) to exert both
lethal and non-lethal eVects on a native species
(Microcosmus squamiger) across multiple early life-history
stages. We determined whether sperm from the invasive
species interfered with the fertilisation of eggs from the
native species and found no eVect. However, we did Wnd
strong eVects of the invasive species on the post-fertilisation
performance of the native species. The invasive species
inhibited the settlement of native larvae and, in the Weld, the
presence of the invasive species was associated with a tenfold
increase in the post-settlement mortality of the native
species, as well as an initial reduction of growth in the
native. Our results suggest that larvae of the native species
avoid settling near the invasive species due to reduced postsettlement
survival in its presence. Overall, we found that
invasive species can have complex and pervasive eVects
(both lethal and non-lethal) across the early life-history
stages of the native species, which are likely to result in its
displacement and to facilitate further invasion.
Keyword Fertilisation
MEDIATED INDIRECT INTERACTIONS
invasive species
settlement
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:30:57 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Biological Sciences