Comparing different modes of delivery: A pilot evaluation of a family-focused, cognitive-behavioral intervention for anxiety-disordered children

Leong, Joyce, Cobham, Vanessa Elise, de Groot, Jules and McDermott, Brett (2009) Comparing different modes of delivery: A pilot evaluation of a family-focused, cognitive-behavioral intervention for anxiety-disordered children. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 18 4: 231-239. doi:10.1007/s00787-008-0723-7


Author Leong, Joyce
Cobham, Vanessa Elise
de Groot, Jules
McDermott, Brett
Title Comparing different modes of delivery: A pilot evaluation of a family-focused, cognitive-behavioral intervention for anxiety-disordered children
Journal name European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1018-8827
1435-165X
Publication date 2009-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00787-008-0723-7
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 18
Issue 4
Start page 231
End page 239
Total pages 9
Editor Jan K. Buitelaar
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer Medizin
Language eng
Subject 1701 Psychology
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
C1
Abstract Cognitive behavior therapy delivered by trained clinicians has been shown to be an effective treatment for childhood anxiety. However, the prevalence of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, combined with the practical and psychological obstacles that often prevent families from accessing professional help, mean that alternative ways of reaching prospective clients must be explored. This pilot study aims to compare the relative efficacy of two different modes of delivering a family-focused, cognitive-behavioral intervention for children with an anxiety disorder. The two modalities compared were: a parent-delivered program (bibliotherapy) and a clinician-delivered program (individual therapy). Twenty-seven children aged between 7 and 14, together with their parents, were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions listed above. Results at post-treatment showed a significant improvement for children in both treatment conditions in terms of diagnostic status, number of diagnoses and severity of primary diagnosis at follow-up. Children in the bibliotherapy condition demonstrated a significant improvement over time in terms of child- and parent-reported anxiety levels. No differences were found between the two treatment conditions on any outcome measure. These results were maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Although a pilot study, these data suggest that a bibliotherapy format of the intervention described may have potential merit. The implications for service delivery are discussed, as are the limitations of this research.
Formatted abstract
Cognitive behavior therapy delivered by trained clinicians has been shown to be an effective treatment for childhood anxiety. However, the prevalence of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents, combined with the practical and psychological obstacles that often prevent families from accessing professional help, mean that alternative ways of reaching prospective clients must be explored. This pilot study aims to compare the relative efficacy of two different modes of delivering a family-focused, cognitive-behavioral intervention for children with an anxiety disorder. The two modalities compared were: a parent-delivered program (bibliotherapy) and a clinician-delivered program (individual therapy). Twenty-seven children aged between 7 and 14, together with their parents, were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions listed above. Results at post-treatment showed a significant improvement for children in both treatment conditions in terms of diagnostic status, number of diagnoses and severity of primary diagnosis at follow-up. Children in the bibliotherapy condition demonstrated a significant improvement over time in terms of child- and parent-reported anxiety levels. No differences were found between the two treatment conditions on any outcome measure. These results were maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Although a pilot study, these data suggest that a bibliotherapy format of the intervention described may have potential merit. The implications for service delivery are discussed, as are the limitations of this research.
Keyword Bibliotherapy
CBT
Childhood anxiety
Treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:22:06 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology