The Effect of Disguise on Novice and Expert Tennis Players' Anticipation Ability

Rowe, Richard, Horswill, Mark S., Kronvall-Parkinson, Mette, Poulter, Damian R. and McKenna, Frank P. (2009) The Effect of Disguise on Novice and Expert Tennis Players' Anticipation Ability. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 21 2: 178-185. doi:10.1080/10413200902785811


Author Rowe, Richard
Horswill, Mark S.
Kronvall-Parkinson, Mette
Poulter, Damian R.
McKenna, Frank P.
Title The Effect of Disguise on Novice and Expert Tennis Players' Anticipation Ability
Journal name Journal of Applied Sport Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1533-1571
1041-3200
Publication date 2009-04-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/10413200902785811
Open Access Status
Volume 21
Issue 2
Start page 178
End page 185
Total pages 8
Editor Vicki Ebbeck
Place of publication United States
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject C1
1701 Psychology
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Skilled performers interpret cues in the preparatory movements of their opponents to anticipate future events in many sports. Little work has tested whether these cues can be disguised. Using a temporal occlusion paradigm, this paper examines the effect of disguise on an Australian sample of expert (16 male, 2 female, age M = 24.67, SD = 9.47 years) and novice players' (24 male, 38 female, age M = 22.26, SD = 5.24 years) anticipation of tennis ground strokes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that expert anticipation was more accurate than novice overall (p < .001), and disguise reduced accuracy (p = .001). The disguise effect differed by expertise across occlusion points (p = .027). The experts' anticipatory advantage was removed by disguise at 40 ms before contact. Novice performance was significantly below chance for disguise shots occluded at contact. These results indicate that disguise is an important topic for research and practice.
Formatted abstract
Skilled performers interpret cues in the preparatory movements of their opponents to anticipate future events in many sports. Little work has tested whether these cues can be disguised. Using a temporal occlusion paradigm, this paper examines the effect of disguise on an Australian sample of expert (16 male, 2 female, age M = 24.67, SD = 9.47 years) and novice players' (24 male, 38 female, age M = 22.26, SD = 5.24 years) anticipation of tennis ground strokes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that expert anticipation was more accurate than novice overall (p < .001), and disguise reduced accuracy (p = .001). The disguise effect differed by expertise across occlusion points (p = .027). The experts' anticipatory advantage was removed by disguise at 40 ms before contact. Novice performance was significantly below chance for disguise shots occluded at contact. These results indicate that disguise is an important topic for research and practice.
Keyword PERCEPTION
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:16:25 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology