On high fertility rates in developing countries: Birth limits, birth taxes, or education subsidies?

Shi, Yuhua and Zhang, Jie (2009) On high fertility rates in developing countries: Birth limits, birth taxes, or education subsidies?. Journal of Population Economics, 22 3: 603-640. doi:10.1007/s00148-008-0212-9

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Shi, Yuhua
Zhang, Jie
Title On high fertility rates in developing countries: Birth limits, birth taxes, or education subsidies?
Journal name Journal of Population Economics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0933-1433
1432-1475
Publication date 2009-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00148-008-0212-9
Open Access Status
Volume 22
Issue 3
Start page 603
End page 640
Total pages 38
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract n this paper, we consider two types of population policies observed in practice: birth limits and birth taxes. We find that both achieve very similar equilibrium solutions if tax revenue finances lump-sum transfers. By reducing fertility and promoting growth, both birth policies may achieve higher welfare than conventional education subsidies financed by income taxes. A birth tax for education subsidies can achieve the first-best solution. The welfare gain of the first-best policy may be equivalent to a massive 10–50% rise in income, depending on the degree of human capital externalities and the elasticity of intertemporal substitution.
Keyword Fertility
Growth
Welfare
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Economics Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:13:09 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Economics