Multiple host use by a sap-sucking membracid: population consequences of nymphal development on primary and secondary host plant species

Manners, AG and Walter, GH (2009) Multiple host use by a sap-sucking membracid: population consequences of nymphal development on primary and secondary host plant species. Arthropod-Plant Interactions, 3 2: 87-98. doi:10.1007/s11829-009-9059-6


Author Manners, AG
Walter, GH
Title Multiple host use by a sap-sucking membracid: population consequences of nymphal development on primary and secondary host plant species
Journal name Arthropod-Plant Interactions   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1872-8855
Publication date 2009-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11829-009-9059-6
Open Access Status
Volume 3
Issue 2
Start page 87
End page 98
Total pages 12
Editor I Menzler-Hokkanen
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Springer - Netherlands
Language eng
Subject 960414 Control of Plant Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Forest and Woodlands Environments
060207 Population Ecology
C1
Formatted abstract
Aconophora compressa is a gregarious, sapsucking
insect that uses multiple host plant species.
Nymphal host plant species (and variety) significantly
affected nymphal survival, nymphal development rate and
the subsequent size and fecundity of adults, with fiddlewood
(Citharexylum spinosum) being significantly best in
all respects. Nymphs that developed on a relatively poor
host (Duranta erecta var ‘‘geisha girl’’) and which were
moved to fiddlewood as adults laid significantly fewer eggs
(mean ± SE = 836 ± 130) than those that developed
solely on fiddlewood (1,329 ± 105). Adults on geisha girl,
regardless of having been reared as nymphs on fiddlewood
or geisha girl, laid significantly fewer eggs (342 ± 83 and
317 ± 74, respectively) than adults on fiddlewood. A
simple model that incorporates host plant related survival,
development rate and fecundity suggests that the population
dynamics of A. compressa are governed mainly by
fiddlewood, the primary host. The results have general
implications for understanding the population dynamics of
herbivores that use multiple host plant species, and also for
the way in which weed biological control host testing
methods should be conducted.
Keyword Aconophora compressa
BIOLOGICAL-CONTROL AGENT
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:12:05 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Biological Sciences