Goal orientations and performance: Differential relationships across levels of analysis and as a function of task demands

Yeo, Gillian, Loft, Shayne, Xiao, Tania and Kiewitz, Christian (2009) Goal orientations and performance: Differential relationships across levels of analysis and as a function of task demands. Journal of Applied Psychology, 94 3: 710-726. doi:10.1037/a0015044

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Author Yeo, Gillian
Loft, Shayne
Xiao, Tania
Kiewitz, Christian
Title Goal orientations and performance: Differential relationships across levels of analysis and as a function of task demands
Journal name Journal of Applied Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9010
1939-1854
Publication date 2009-05-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0015044
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 94
Issue 3
Start page 710
End page 726
Total pages 17
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Subject C1
170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Goal orientation and self-regulation theories were integrated to develop a multilevel framework aimed at addressing controversies regarding the magnitude and direction of goal orientation effects on performance. In Study 1, goal orientations were measured repeatedly whilst individuals performed an air traffic control task. In Study 2, goal orientations and exam performance were measured across 3 time points while undergraduates completed a course. Mastery-approach orientation was positively related to performance at the intraindividual level, but not at the interindividual level, and its effect was not moderated by task demands. Performance-approach positively predicted performance at the interindividual level, and at the intraindividual level, the direction of its effect switched as a function of task demands. Performance-avoid negatively predicted performance at the interindividual level but did not emerge as an intraindividual predictor. Mastery-avoid did not relate to performance at either level of analysis. This consistent pattern across 2 studies suggests that levels of analysis and task demands can determine the magnitude and direction of goal orientation effects on performance and highlights avenues for theory development.
Keyword goal orientation
performance
intraindividual and interindividual levels of analysis
task complexity
task practice
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 40 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 03 Sep 2009, 18:09:33 EST by Mr Andrew Martlew on behalf of School of Psychology